We hang out together

Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen (1) Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen (2) Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen (3) Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen (4)

Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen

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We could have a burger

Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. Slow Wood was in the kitchen of KidsRoomZoom during the 2011Fu (2) Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. Slow Wood was in the kitchen of KidsRoomZoom during the 2011Fu (3) Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. Slow Wood was in the kitchen of KidsRoomZoom during the 2011Fu (4) Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. Slow Wood was in the kitchen of KidsRoomZoom during the 2011Fu (1)

SLOW WOOD by Studio Fludd // Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. To find out more, visit their website here

We feel squeezed

Soft Light by Simon Frambach (2) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (3) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (4) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (5) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (1)

Soft Light by Simon Frambach /

You lay down in bed to read for a few minutes. You need both a night light for reading and a pillow to life your head. In the creative mind of Simon Frambach, that combination is one. Simon created a inventive new way to create light and rest by combing polyurethane foam and a lightbulb with a protective cage. The soft white polyurethane foam turns the harsh bright light into a warm glow that you can stuff anywhere. You can tuck the light under  your head and use if as a pillow. Jam the light in a small spot where it stays nestled in place providing you with a little extra light for reading or play. (via induldg.com)

We dont have time

By The Hour by Jess FüglerBy the Hour is a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers but instead looks to use an alternating surface (2)By The Hour by Jess FüglerBy the Hour is a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers but instead looks to use an alternating surface (3)By The Hour by Jess FüglerBy the Hour is a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers but instead looks to use an alternating surface (4)By The Hour by Jess FüglerBy the Hour is a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers but instead looks to use an alternating surface (1)

‘By the Hour’ –  a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers
but instead looks to use an alternating surface, designed by Jess Fügler

We like geometry

 

Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (2)Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (3)Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (1)

‘Miss Maple’ designed by Elisa Strozyk and photographed by Sebastian Neeb /// Text from the designer’s website:

MISS MAPLE

pendant lamp, 85 x 85 x 35 cm
material: wooden textile, steel

The pendant lamp “Miss Maple” is showing the use of a familiar material in an unconventional way. We usually experience wood as a plain surface, but here it is broken down into a grid of triangles. This makes a flexible lampshade which can be transformed manually in three-dimensional ways.
While the lamp generates warm light at night the surface outside becomes more evident with daylight and turns the lamp into sculptural object.

We multi-task

Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (2) Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (3) Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (1)

Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova.

Russian designer Anna Lotova slotted two layers of foam beneath the surface of this wooden desk to create squishy spaces for storing stationery and other objects.

Named Oxymoron Desk, the piece combines two contrasting materials for its tabletop;  two thick layers of upholstered foam are sandwiched between a pair of plywood sheets with curved edges.

A sliced opening along the top plywood sheet exposes the soft layer underneath, creating a place where documents and stationery can be inserted.

“As an architect and designer I know how important it is to have a comfortable and enjoyable work table,” said Lotova. “Oxymoron Desk is a result of interaction between two contradictory materials that enhance each other and gain a new meaning.”

A side table can also be added by slipping an extra piece of plywood between the two cushioned layers on either side of the desk.

An accompanying lamp can also be inserted between the layers, or can be slotted into the top and positioned at different angles. (Text via dezeen.com)

We make moves

Got Chess (2015) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2016) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2017) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2018) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2014) by Peter Baeten

Flat design meets Moleskine notebooks meets… chess.

Inspired by classic leather notebooks, this pared-back chess set is gorgeous in its simplicity and execution. Belgian designer Peter Baeten has channelled his love of classic leather notebooks into this beautiful minimal chess set.

“By working with the silhouettes of the pieces, it walks the line between 2D and 3D. Because of this, only the ones who are playing have a complete overview of the pieces on the board. Bystanders will have to do with seeing lines move around on the board,” Baeten explains.

“The set is lasercut and hand varnished, so the natural wood grains remain visible. It contains 4 tablets and a leather cover which also serves as a pad to play on. There are no screws, hinges, glue, or any other type of materials used, therefore there is no assembly necessary, and each single piece can easily be replaced.”

(text via creativeblog.com)