East to West

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Beautiful landscape photography series ‘East/West’ by Jonathan Smith

We are stacking up

 

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Cosmopolitan Las Vegas – Stunning photos of seemingly empty buildings in Vegas by Tim Navis

We went to the gym

Tiny Bruce Lee Uses Martial Arts to Prepare Breakfast by VSE OK  (2)Tiny Bruce Lee Uses Martial Arts to Prepare Breakfast by VSE OK  (3)Tiny Bruce Lee Uses Martial Arts to Prepare Breakfast by VSE OK  (4)Tiny Bruce Lee Uses Martial Arts to Prepare Breakfast by VSE OK  (5)Tiny Bruce Lee Uses Martial Arts to Prepare Breakfast by VSE OK  (1)

Tiny Bruce Lee Uses Martial Arts to Prepare Breakfast by Russian photographer VSE OK

We turn on the lights

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Photographs portraying New York City during the night; capturing its beautiful illumination. Unknown photographer

We defy gravity

Sand Creatures  Claire Droppert (2)Sand Creatures  Claire Droppert (3)Sand Creatures  Claire Droppert (4)Sand Creatures  Claire Droppert (5)Sand Creatures  Claire Droppert (6)BullSand Creatures  Claire Droppert

“Sand comes alive and creatures are born in frozen moments of weightlessness…”

from her series ‘Sand Creatures’ – beautiful photographs by Claire Droppert

Houses of the Holy

 

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‘Houses of the Holy’ – stunning photographs of colorful vaulted mosque ceilings, captured by Mohammad Reza Domiri Ganji

We find space

 

House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (5)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (3)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (2)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (4)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (1)

House in Fukawa, Japan by ‘Suppose Design Office’

We like geometry

 

Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (2)Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (3)Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (1)

‘Miss Maple’ designed by Elisa Strozyk and photographed by Sebastian Neeb /// Text from the designer’s website:

MISS MAPLE

pendant lamp, 85 x 85 x 35 cm
material: wooden textile, steel

The pendant lamp “Miss Maple” is showing the use of a familiar material in an unconventional way. We usually experience wood as a plain surface, but here it is broken down into a grid of triangles. This makes a flexible lampshade which can be transformed manually in three-dimensional ways.
While the lamp generates warm light at night the surface outside becomes more evident with daylight and turns the lamp into sculptural object.

We are back in the jungle

Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (2)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (3)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (4)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (5)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (6)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (7)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (8)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (1)

Wandering in the Woods, photography art by ‘Oer-Wout

We are going on holiday

Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (2) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (3) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (4) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (5) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (6) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (1)

‘Minimal Greece’ – Rich Blues and Bright Whites from the baron islands of Greece by Tom Blachford

We connect

Grimanesa Amoros (3) Grimanesa Amoros (5) Grimanesa Amoros (2) Grimanesa Amoros (4) Grimanesa Amoros

‘Golden Connection’ – light installation in the Four Seasons Hotel for the Art Basel Show in Hong Kong, 2013 by artist Grimanese Amoros

India by Drone

india by drone photography aerial travel 7 india by drone photography aerial travel 6 india by drone photography aerial travel 5 india by drone photography aerial travel 4 india by drone photography aerial travel 3 india by drone photography aerial travel 2 india by drone photography aerial travel 1 A knot of fishing boats at the entrance to Sassoon Dock, Mumbai.

India by Drone – Photographer Amos Chapple’s remarkable aerial views of India were shot by attaching his camera to a ‘quadcopter’ drone

Wallflower

Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (2) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (3) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (4) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (5) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (6) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (2) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes

In her series ‘Landscapes’ – Peruvian artist Cecilia Paredes Peruvian has mastered the art of camouflage and by using body paint is able to disappear into her surroundings. With the help of her assistants, she paints herself into the background of floral wallpapers. Her dark hair and the whites of the eyes are often the only thing that shows there’s a person hiding.

However, her series called “Landscapes” doesn’t just create a disappearance illusion, it also shows Paredes’ quest for belonging.

“The theme behind all is re-location after displacement and migration and how one has to adjust in order to belong. Tough it is, but it has to be done, without forgetting our origin. The theme behind all is re-location after displacement and migration and how one has to adjust in order to belong. Tough it is, but it has to be done, without forgetting our origin.”

(via demilked.com)

 

We multi-task

Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (2) Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (3) Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (1)

Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova.

Russian designer Anna Lotova slotted two layers of foam beneath the surface of this wooden desk to create squishy spaces for storing stationery and other objects.

Named Oxymoron Desk, the piece combines two contrasting materials for its tabletop;  two thick layers of upholstered foam are sandwiched between a pair of plywood sheets with curved edges.

A sliced opening along the top plywood sheet exposes the soft layer underneath, creating a place where documents and stationery can be inserted.

“As an architect and designer I know how important it is to have a comfortable and enjoyable work table,” said Lotova. “Oxymoron Desk is a result of interaction between two contradictory materials that enhance each other and gain a new meaning.”

A side table can also be added by slipping an extra piece of plywood between the two cushioned layers on either side of the desk.

An accompanying lamp can also be inserted between the layers, or can be slotted into the top and positioned at different angles. (Text via dezeen.com)

We want a cabin

Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan via Archdaily (2) Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan via Archdaily (3) Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan

Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan by Sou Fujimoto Architects / Photographed by Iwan Baan

 

Words from the architect: I thought of making an ultimate wooden architecture. It was conceived by just mindlessly stacking 350mm square.

Lumber is extremely versatile. In an ordinary wooden architecture, lumber is effectively differentiated according to functions in various localities precisely because it is so versatile. Columns, beams, foundations, exterior walls, interior walls, ceilings, floorings, insulations, furnishings, stairs, window frames, meaning all. However, I thought if lumber is indeed so versatile then why not create architecture by one rule that fulfills all of these functions. I envisioned the creation of new spatiality that preserves primitive conditions of a harmonious entity before various functions and roles differentiated.

There are no separations of floor, wall, and ceiling here. A place that one thought was a floor becomes a chair, a ceiling, a wall from various positions. The floor levels are relative and spatiality is perceived differently according to one’s position. Here, people are distributed three-dimensionally in the space. This is a place like an amorphous landscape with a new experience of various senses of distances. Inhabitants discover, rather than being prescribed, various functionalities in these convolutions.

This bungalow no longer fits the category of wooden architecture. If wooden architecture is merely something made from wood, then wood itself surpasses the architectural procedures to directly become a “place where people live” in this bungalow. It is of an existence akin to primitive conditions before architecture. Rather than just a new architecture, this is a new origin, a new existence.

We are one in a million

One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (2) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (3) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (4) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (5) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (1)

‘One million stars’  – art installation by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos.

In short, The Million Stars project is an international weaving art project sparked by a personal repsonse to a local tragedy…” read more here

Yellow Sea

Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (2) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (3) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (4) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (5) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (6) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (1)

Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China / unknown photographer(s)

Rainbow Room

Pierre Le Riche (5) Pierre Le Riche (3) Pierre Le Riche (2) Pierre Le Riche (4) Pierre Le Richerainbow room1 rainbow room

‘The rainbow room’ – an installation on homo-sexuality by Pierre le Riche.

The ‘rainbow room’ installation by cape town-based designer pierre le riche takes a critical look at the sociological implications of afrikaner masculine hegemony on homosexuality in post-apartheid south africa. The intervention, built from 17km of acrylic thread in colours of the gay pride flag, represents a traditional afrikaan family living room in the midst of the 1995 rugby world cup final match displayed on a television; an incredibly significant point in south african history, and perhaps the last chance the afrikaner male had to ‘prove his superiority’. Through an implementation of colorful and playful yarn bombs onto traditional pieces of furniture and over 150 rugby balls, the concept of homosexuality and masculinity is juxtaposed, questioning the acceptance of same-sex relations. (text via designboom)

Metropolis

Reflexiones - Examples of contemporary architecture in the cities of Madrid, Santiago de Compostela, Avilés, Bilbao by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich From the series: Reflexiones - Examples of contemporary architecture in Spain and the UAE by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich From the series: Reflexiones - Examples of contemporary architecture in Spain and the UAE by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich From the series: Reflexiones - Examples of contemporary architecture in Spain and the UAE by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich

From the series: Reflexiones – Examples of contemporary architecture in Spain and the UAE by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich

We feel bubbly

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Incredible bubble art by Japanese artist Tomoya Matsuura.

In this installation, which he calls ‘Conduction’, the young artist physically put “countless” bubbles on a thread and took photographs of it. This resultant object, made of bubbles, keeps changing constantly due to changes in temperature, humidity and the timing of the photograph. After some retouching of the raw material in the photographs, this is what he ended up with. (via visualdisobedience.com)

We make faces

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Meet ‘Marutaro The Hedgehog‘ :)

We make moves

Got Chess (2015) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2016) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2017) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2018) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2014) by Peter Baeten

Flat design meets Moleskine notebooks meets… chess.

Inspired by classic leather notebooks, this pared-back chess set is gorgeous in its simplicity and execution. Belgian designer Peter Baeten has channelled his love of classic leather notebooks into this beautiful minimal chess set.

“By working with the silhouettes of the pieces, it walks the line between 2D and 3D. Because of this, only the ones who are playing have a complete overview of the pieces on the board. Bystanders will have to do with seeing lines move around on the board,” Baeten explains.

“The set is lasercut and hand varnished, so the natural wood grains remain visible. It contains 4 tablets and a leather cover which also serves as a pad to play on. There are no screws, hinges, glue, or any other type of materials used, therefore there is no assembly necessary, and each single piece can easily be replaced.”

(text via creativeblog.com)

We took a bath

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Underwater Photography by Maltese photographer Kurt Arrigo

Cocoon

Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (2) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (3) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (4) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (5) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (6) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (7) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (8) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (9) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (10) Cocoons  Peter Steinhauer (1)

Amazing photographs from the series ‘Cocoons’  by Peter Steinhauer

Singapore-based photographer peter steinhauer documents the architecture within the urban landscape of hong kong from an uncommon perspective — when the monolithic structures are under construction. his series of ‘cocoon’ compositions capture the towering edifices entirely wrapped in a veil of vibrantly colored silk — a typical structural material unique to the metropolis, which contains debris within and prevents it falling onto the street beneath. enveloped in the brightly-hued fabric, the skyscrapers cloaked in the web of textiles transforms the cityscape, seeming more like a massive artistic intervention rather than a construction device. blue, yellow and green fibers act as a cape, draping over every structural feature like a blanket, framing the scene. the series’ namesake references the casing that wraps some insects during a stage of their metamorphosis from caterpillar to butterfly — an appropriate way to characterize the architectural sites as they undergo their own structural renovations. (text via designboom)

We need cover

Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (4) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (6) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (2) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (3) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (5)

Beautiful photographs of the very elegant racetrack stands of the Zarzuela Hippodrome (1935) in Madrid, Spain, by architects Carlos Arniches and Martín Dominguez, and engineer Eduardo Torroja / photographed by Ximo Michavila.

We had an important day

The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (2) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (3) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (4) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (5) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (6) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (7) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (8) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (1)

The Mini Book of Life’s Major Events by artist Evan Lorenzen

Herringbone

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The beautiful ‘Herringbone House’ by London based Atelier ChanChan in Islington, London. Photographs by Mike Tsang.

Words from the architect:

The house aims to relate to its context by taking the syntax of the local vernacular: namely gable ended roofs and the brick material of the Victorian terraces. However, the open plan interiors with ceiling to floor windows, skylights and courtyards are supported by a modern steel structure.

The combination making for a modern vernacular house inspired by the old to create something new. The ornamental herringbone brickwork was used to create personal expression and to articulate the picture windows and volumes by using framing, pattern and variety in the laying of the bricks.

We need an umbrella

A Colorful Canopy of Umbrellas Returns to the Streets of Agueda, Portugal (2) A Colorful Canopy of Umbrellas Returns to the Streets of Agueda, Portugal (3) A Colorful Canopy of Umbrellas Returns to the Streets of Agueda, Portugal (4) A Colorful Canopy of Umbrellas Returns to the Streets of Agueda, Portugal (1)

Beautiful photographs of the colorful canopy of umbrellas once again returning to the streets of Agueda, Portugal in  July 2013 / captured by Patrícia Almeida

We are a bit dizzy

LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (5) LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (4) LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (3) LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (2) LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (1)

Light Rorschach“, a series of photographs of Nicolas Rivals mixing abstract portraits, reflections in water and light painting to give us some beautiful light Rorschach tests… “A Light Painting work that let everyone see his own representation of what is in the picture. The aesthetics of melting metal associated with the symmetry of reflection in the water causes the viewer to question the reality of these photographs…” (Text via Ufunk.net)

We are going to court

From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts:From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts:

From his series ‘Courts’ by photographer Ward Roberts:

Sports courts are subjects to extremes: battered by the stomps and slams of players or else left in silence. These days, much of the beauty and pathos of courts lies in their minimalist sentiment. In their deserted state they become sculptural, attracting the eye of the photographer or painter more than the player. As Ward’s photographs show us, we easily sympathize with the treatment of such venues that are developed purely for our use and occasionally attract abuse. The only evidence of action you’ll see on many outdoor courts nowadays is the handy work of amateur graffiti ‘artists’. For many, the attraction to healthy recreational activities has been superseded by faster, louder viewing experiences. The humble local court has been neglected in preference to the stadium, which delivers sport as spectacle with staples like pre-match entertainment, merchandise and a bar. The surrounding buildings that feature in many of Ward’s images give us another clue as to where all the playing action has gone – indoors. Text by Ward Roberts

Tree House

Tree House by 6a architects (7) Tree House by 6a architects (6) Tree House by 6a architects (5) Tree House by 6a architects (4) Tree House by 6a architects (3) Tree House by 6a architects (2) Tree House by 6a architects

‘Tree House’ by London based architecture studio 6a Architects // Photography by Johan Dehlin.

London studio 6a Architects has extended the home of architecture critic Rowan Moore and his family by adding a timber structure that curves around a tree (+ slideshow). The extension was designed by 6a Architects to provide a new ground-floor bedroom and bathroom for the London house, which is an amalgamation of two cottages constructed in the 1830s. A ramped corridor runs parallel to the existing house, negotiating a gentle change in level and allowing access for the mother of the family, who uses a wheelchair. This corridor connects the house’s living room with the new bedroom suite, which extends out into the garden. The exterior of the structure is clad with reclaimed timber, while white-painted timber panels line the interior walls. Glazed doors open the space out to a curving timber deck that surrounds the sumac tree and steps down to the garden. (Text via dezeen)

We stay where we are

Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague.

Beautiful photographs from the series ‘Limbo’ by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:

Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague.

We aim

Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (2) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (5) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (8) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (3) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (6) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (9) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (4) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (7) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried

From his series ‘Bowling Alleys’ by Robert Götzfried  – another intriguing example of how great photography can give artistic beauty to the most unlikeliest of places.

We are back to business

Wet Dog by Sophie Gamand (2) Wet Dog by Sophie Gamand (3) Wet Dog by Sophie Gamand (1)wetdog08 wetdog09 wetdog21 wetdog05 wetdog02

After a little holiday, we are back with a bang – a hilarious one:

From her series “Wet Dog” – a fantastic set of dog portraits by photographer Sophie Gamand of Striking Paws. Words from her website:

Wet Dog is a series of portraits of dogs caught mid-bath, by photographer Sophie Gamand. The way the water plays with their hair in a very painterly manner, and their facial expressions as the water is poured on them creates striking portraits. The dogs are caught at a vulnerable moment, half a second before they shake the water off their fur. The series was done in collaboration with groomer and pet stylist Ruben Santana. Beside the esthetic aspect of grooming, it is also a necessary routine for dogs and helps prevent diseases and infection.
Through her photography, Sophie Gamand explores the complex relationship between dogs and humans. She also wishes to challenge that bond: how far do we take our relationship to our pets? How much are dogs willing to accept to maintain this bond? There is a lot of co-dependance in the dog/human dynamic. With her work, Sophie Gamand wants others to see dogs for what they are: more than just animals. They are life companions. When she photographs dogs, she looks for the human in them: an expression, the life in their eyes, a smile. It’s almost as if humans and dogs are morphing into one-another. It’s more than just anthropomorphism though. Sophie doesn’t try to attribute human qualities to dogs. She tries to capture the ones that she believes are already there.

We fly away

Nature’s jetpacks. Photography by Nordin Seruyan (2) Nature’s jetpacks. Photography by Nordin Seruyan (3) Nature’s jetpacks. Photography by Nordin Seruyan (1)

Hello Everyone…. We are off for a one week break, holidaying in Athens, Greece. Have a great Easter! See you soon…

/ Nature’s jetpacks. Beautiful macro photography by Nordin Seruyan

Flower Power

Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (2) Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (3) Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (1)

‘Table for a Flower’ by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem

We carve out

The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown phootgrapher The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown phootgrapher The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown phootgrapher The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown phootgrapher

The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown photographer

We are making ice cubes

Heidi RomanoThe micro environments found in Frozen Water (2) Heidi RomanoThe micro environments found in Frozen Water (3) Heidi RomanoThe micro environments found in Frozen Water (4) Heidi RomanoThe micro environments found in Frozen Water (5) Heidi RomanoThe micro environments found in Frozen Water (6) Heidi RomanoThe micro environments found in Frozen Water (1)

‘Frozen Water’ – a beautiful photo series by Australian photographer Heidi Romano  that comprises beautiful, abstract close-up photos of ice. and transforms otherwise ordinary blocks of ice into dramatic landscapes full of dark beauty. (via designtaxi.com)

Slippery Slope

Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters.

House K by world renowned Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto / photographs by Iwan Baan, text by designboom:

Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters.

Skyscapes

This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. (Text by Juxtapox.com)

Wonderful color photographs by Eric Cahan.

This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. (Text by Juxtapox.com)

We stay calm

A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites - the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major

A selection of beautiful minimalistic and serene photographs by one of our favorites – the very talented Hungarian photographer Akos Major

360

360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-17 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-18 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-16 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-15 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-11 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-12 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-10 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-9 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-8 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-5 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-4 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-2 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-1 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-3360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (2) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (3) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (4) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (5) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (1)

Amazing 360 degree storybooks by Japanese artist and architect Yusuke Oono who has designed a fantastic series of 40-page books that fan out into 360-degree carousels, each page laser-cut and bound from Yusuke’s digital design.

We grow

Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra

Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra

Mum’s Place

Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)  Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)

A wonderful example of beautiful simplicity – a corrugated aluminum ‘house for mother’ in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)

‘House for mother’ by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF), is located in linköping, sweden, and is part of the linköpingsbo 2017 housing exhibition. the dwelling is divided into two parallel volumes slightly shifted from each other, thus creating spaces both in front of and behind the building. oriented to a park in the north, and an alley in the south, the two adjacent gables emphasize the overall theme for the area in general: narrow plots and a variation of housing types. the first form contains the kitchen, dining room and living room, with the bathroom and laundry room housed in a smaller cabin within the structure. the second volume, partly in two levels with a less inclined roof, accommodates  the bedrooms and a small studio. the façades and roof are covered with raw, corrugated aluminum in juxtaposition to the warm interior with an exposed timber structure and walls lined with plywood. the polished concrete flooring folds up along the perimeter of the building and transforms into a bench and shelf. (Text via designboom.com / all images courtesy of förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)

The secret life of Elgin Park

Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.  Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.  Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.             Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.

Welcome to the City of Elgin Park.

Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.

As a professional model maker, Smith’s models are detailed enough to withstand the scrutiny of close-up photography. Smith places them in miniature dioramas and uses forced perspective to make parts of the real world lend his pictures additional realism. The result is a quirky sort of historical fiction – faithfully and authentically reproduced scenes from a small American town that never actually happened (but could have).

What’s also great about his Elgin Park collection is that the magician is willing to reveal his secrets. Smith’s Flickr gallery often pairs his brilliant illusions with a picture that breaks their carefully arranged perspective and reveals how he managed to blend reality and his imagined history. His pictures are an excellent example of how art can be used to fool the eyes.

Source: Michael Paul Smith (via boredpanda.com

We miss Berlin

The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of BerlinThe 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin

The ‘Atriumhaus’ – a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin

With a sure hand bfs architects have helped an atrium house in Berlin’s famous Hansaviertel back to its former glamour. The modernist building was part of the 1957 building exhibition in Berlin’s Tiergarten park. It was designed by Eduard Ludwig, who among other things also designed the airlift monument at Tempelhof airport.

Photographs by Annette Kisling | Text by: Mirko Beetschen

We have a sense of humour

artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (1) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (8) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (7) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (6)artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (2) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (3)artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (5) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (4)

Humorous artworks using a variety of different media by artist Ole Ukena.

We stick out

Majestic black and white Matterhorn portraits by Nenad Saljic Majestic black and white Matterhorn portraits by Nenad Saljic Majestic black and white Matterhorn portraits by Nenad Saljic Majestic black and white Matterhorn portraits by Nenad Saljic Majestic black and white Matterhorn portraits by Nenad Saljic

Majestic black and white Matterhorn portraits by Nenad Saljic. The Matterhorn, also known as Monte Cervino or Mont Cervin, is a mountain in the Pennine Alps on the border between Switzerland and Italy. Its summit is 4,478 metres high, making it one of the highest peaks in the Alps.

We orbit

'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. Tomas Saraceno - In Orbit (2013 (4) Tomas Saraceno - In Orbit (2013 (5) 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication.

‘In Orbit’ ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.

Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.

Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:

This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication.

Text Via colossal / All photographs © Studio Saraceno & Kunstsammlung NRW

Dot Dot Dot

“I’m Here, but Nothing” - black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil. “I’m Here, but Nothing” - black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil. Yayoi Kusama - I’m Here But Nothing (2000-11) (4) “I’m Here, but Nothing” - black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil. “I’m Here, but Nothing” - black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil.

“I’m Here, but Nothing” – black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil.