We grow

The Garden of Exile, at the Jewish Museum of Berlin – one of my oldest and favourite photographs. 

We weave

Detail photograph of The Bombay Sapphire Distillery, near London, England; designed by Heatherwick Architects.

We like the urban jungle.

Urban city landscape as it should be – at the amazing High Line in NYC. 

We need more storage space

The National Library of Greece, awaiting its 2 million books and records.

We are olympians.

The Panathenaic Stadium, Athens – birthplace of the Olympic Games.

We need space

The wonderful Turbine Hall of London’s Tate Modern Museum. 

We take a different view

Looking up at the famous Guggenheim Museum in NYC. Follow us on Instagram

We sparkle

Soho House Berlin. Follow us now on Instagram

We feel perplexed

From the series Intersection. Follow us now also on Instagram

We are small

The amazing Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern Museum, London. Photographed by Tom Radenz

We climb

This is what we call a sky garden – the amazing Guinigi Tower in Lucca, Tuscany, Italy. Follow us now Instagram :)

We are coming out of our shell

One of our favourite spots in Berlin, the House of World Cultures.

We are looking up

Prague’s St. Vitus Cathedral.

We got a bit lost.

Save

Panoramic View

An old residential building is seen surrounded by a newly-built ring viaduct, in Guangzhou

An old residential building is seen surrounded by a newly-built ring viaduct, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, June 18, 2015. The building was planned to be demolished, but several units in the building refused to move out as they couldn’t reach a compensation agreement with the authority, local media reported. Picture via REUTERS/Ma Qiang/Southern Metropolis Daily

We are going in circles

Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (3) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (4) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (5) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (6) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (1)

Hostel Wadi in Kasterlee, Belgium by Studio Bernardo Secchi & Paola Viganò. Photos by Frederik Buyckx

We are getting married

Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (10) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (9) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (8) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (7) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (6) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (5) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (4) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (3) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (2) Sifnos Tom Radenz Hovercraftdoggy (1) IMG_7032-11 IMG_7420-11 IMG_7562-11 IMG_7570-11 IMG_7533-11 IMG_7544-11 IMG_7263-11 IMG_7164-11-2

We are off getting married on the beautiful Greek island of Sifnos. See you in 3 weeks :)

Photographs by Tom Radenz

We are city dwellers

Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (1) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (2) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (3) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (4) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (5) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (6) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (7) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (8) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (9)

In a surreal blend of day and night, Budapest-based photographer Bence Bakonyi’s series “Urbanite” features vast cityscapes seemingly devoid of people. Shot in Hong Kong and Shanghai, the series presents settings in which the presence of humanity is eerily close, as though the population had suddenly fled, leaving lights on and laundry on the line.Bakonyi’s artist statement describes the series’ intended effect upon its audience; “The ‘Urbanite’ series is an account of how the artist found his home in the unknown. We can see the city as it is presented by the photographer, but also the artist who is in turn brought closer to us by China.” (text via fstoppers.com)

We are amused

Cony Island Architecture  Franck Bohbot (2) Cony Island Architecture  Franck Bohbot (3) Cony Island Architecture  Franck Bohbot (4) Cony Island Architecture  Franck Bohbot (5) Cony Island Architecture  Franck Bohbot (6) Cony Island Architecture  Franck Bohbot

Cony Island amusement park, Brooklyn, New York City by Franck Bohbot

Bohbot’s series, entitled “Last Stop — Coney Island” transforms the seedy New York amusement park into a placid landscape of washed out pastels and muted dreams. Through Bohbot’s lens, the park morphs into a hazy limbo trapped somewhere between a child’s idealised version of the adventure park and an adult’s far more jaded perspective. The eerie yet beautiful landscapes conjure the opposite feeling of actually being at the crowded, sweat-filled pier, and that’s exactly why they have us so entranced.

We could use a cabin

A Canadian treehouse (1) A Canadian treehouse (2) A Canadian treehouse (3) A Canadian treehouse (4)Lake-Cottage-By-UUfie_dezeen_3

Lake-Cottage-By-UUfie_dezeen_9

A Lake Cottage in Bolsover, Ontario, Canada by UUfie / photographed by Naho Kubota.

Words from the architects:

Lake Cottage is a reinterpretation of living in a tree house where nature is an integral part of the building. In a forest of birch and spruce trees along the Kawartha Lakes, the cottage is designed as a two storey, multi-uses space for a large family. The structure, composed of a 7m high A-frame pitch roof covered in black steel and charred cedar siding. A deep cut in the building volume creates a cantilever overhang for a protected outdoor terrace with mirrors to further give the illusion of the building containing the forest inside.

Fourteen openings in the main living space reveal both inhabited spaces, skies and trees. The abstract nature of the interior spaces allows the imagination to flow, and those spaces that could be identified as a domestic interior can suddenly become play spaces. A solid timber staircase leads to a loft which gives the feeling of ascending into tree canopies as sunlight softy falls on a wall covered in shingles stained in light blue.

Using local materials and traditional construction methods, the cottage incorporated sustainable principles. The black wood cladding of the exterior is a technique of charring cedar that acts as a natural agent against termite and fire. Thick walls and roof provide high insulation value, a central wood hearth provides heat, deep recessed windows and operable skylights provide ventilation and diffused natural light.

We craft

ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (1) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (2) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (3) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (4) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (5) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (6)

‘ARTS & CRAFTS’ by 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol

We light up

James Turrell James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (3) James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (4) James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (5) James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (6) James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (1)

‘Aten Reign’ by light artist James Turrell’s, in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York.

House of Patios

East façade fragment showing living room and bedroom´s courtya House of Patios AR arquitetos (3) Detail of mezzanine from staircase Backyard view pointing northwest Courtyard upward view East façade fragment showing mezzanine´s courtyard, evening vi

‘Casa dos pátios’ in Sao Paulo, Brazil – designed by ar arquitetos / photographed by Leonardo Finotti

We are a mazed

Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (2) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (3) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (4) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (5) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (6) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (1)

A giant 60-foot maze at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C created by Danish architects BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group

Factory Living

Bofill_266-12 001 Bofill_266-02 001 The Factory, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by Ricardo Bofill (4) The Factory, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by Ricardo Bofill (5) The Factory, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by Ricardo Bofill (6) The Factory, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by Ricardo Bofill (1)

The amazing ‘Factory’, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by architect Ricardo Bofill.

In 1973 Ricardo Bofill found a disused cement factory, an industrial complex from the turn of the century consisting of over 30 silos, subterranean galleries and huge machine rooms, and he decided to transform it into the head office of Taller de Arquitectura. Remodelling work lasted two years. The factory, abandoned and partially in ruins, was a compendium of surrealist elements: stairs that climbed up to nowhere, mighty reinforced concrete structures that sustained nothing, pieces of iron hanging in the air, huge empty spaces filled nonetheless with magic.

Mercedes Museum

Mercedes Benz Museum at Stuttgart (2) Mercedes Benz Museum at Stuttgart (3) Mercedes Benz Museum at Stuttgart (4) Mercedes Benz Museum at Stuttgart (5) Mercedes Benz Museum at Stuttgart (1)mercedes-benz-museum-9 mercedes-benz-museum-10 mercedes-benz-museum-15 mercedes-benz-museum-16 mercedes-benz-museum-20 mercedes-benz-museum-18

Mercedes Benz Museum, in Stuttgart, Germany – designed by UN Studio and photographed by Maik Lipp

Urban abstracts

Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (2) Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (3) Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (4) Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (5) Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (6) Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (1)

From the series ‘Reflexionen Eins’ by Matthias Heiderich. Matthias is a self taught photographer who lives in Berlin, Germany and loves architecture. He is a 32-year-old landscape photographer, heavily influenced by architecture, graphic design, colour and the urban landscape, seems primarily concerned about the composition and the colors. The symmetry and truth that comes out of every building as a living organism. Combining colorful and vibrant images he creates somehow unreal and yet timeless landscapes that represent Berlin in wonderful facets

We are going in circles

Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (2)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (3)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (4)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (5)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (6)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (7)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza

The Ma: Andalucia’s Museum of Memory, in Avenida de las Ciencias, Granada, Spain designed by Alberto Campo Baeza Architects. / photographed by Javier Callejas

We work late

Spectacular Black & White Tokyo Cityscape Photography by Marcin Stawiarz (2)Spectacular Black & White Tokyo Cityscape Photography by Marcin Stawiarz (3)Spectacular Black & White Tokyo Cityscape Photography by Marcin Stawiarz (4)Spectacular Black & White Tokyo Cityscape Photography by Marcin Stawiarz (5)Spectacular Black & White Tokyo Cityscape Photography by Marcin Stawiarz (6)Spectacular Black & White Tokyo Cityscape Photography by Marcin Stawiarz (1)

Spectacular black & white Tokyo cityscape photography by Martin Stavars

Broken Home

Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (2)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (3)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (4)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (1)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (5)

Installation of miniature houses by Savona and Milan based artist Daniele Del Nero from the “Brockenhaus” series. Using black paper, Del Nero constructs architectural scale models of deserted towns. To create the effect of neglect and abandonment, the artist covers the black paper with construction paste and flour.

In his artist statement, Del Nero writes, “My purpose is to talk about the sense of time and destiny of the planet after the human species, through the sense of restlessness which abandoned buildings are able to communicate.”

We convert

Gym Turned Into Beautiful Concert Hall (1)Gym Turned Into Beautiful Concert Hall (3)Gym Turned Into Beautiful Concert Hall (2)arcus-temporium-A-Concert-Hall-in-the-Archabbey-of-Pannonhalma-yatzer-10 arcus-temporium-A-Concert-Hall-in-the-Archabbey-of-Pannonhalma-yatzer-13 arcus-temporium-A-Concert-Hall-in-the-Archabbey-of-Pannonhalma-yatzer-4 arcus-temporium-A-Concert-Hall-in-the-Archabbey-of-Pannonhalma-yatzer-9

A Gym transformed into a concert hall in the Pannonhalma Archabbey, Hungary by three young Hungarian architects Dániel Baló, Dániel Eke and Zoltán Kalászi. Photography by Tamás Bujnovszky.

Words from the architects: >> In order to create an interior which was suitable for classical concerts, first of all we had to somehow fade out the gym’s characteristic appearance and find a suitable cover. But further on, we were eager to form an atmosphere that would compliment musical events and to then partition the homogenous space through gentle transitions. We therefore created a spatial structure built from two items: This included the creation of an interacting translucent media system and a geometric grid of point lights. The media system’s hanging layers are made out of a thermally bonded non-woven geotextile fabric. As the fabric dominates over the beams and walls, we then blurred the room’s boarders through the use of different outlines and the translucent, opalescent texture of the fabric’s layers. We also defined the locations of the two main functions, these being the auditorium and stage. The point lights themselves are made from light bulbs which emit equal intensity light and hang in equal distance at the nodes of a square raster. These bulbs are hidden among the waving textile layers above the auditorium, and come into view above the stage thus bringing the musicians into focus. With the use of the textile layers, we succeeded in improving the room’s acoustics whereby the hanging ribs dampened the sharp reflecting sounds dispersing them through the space. This in turn, generated a more comfortable atmosphere and optimized the musical experience.<<

We are stacking up

 

Cosmopolitan Las Vegas (2)Cosmopolitan Las Vegas (3)Cosmopolitan Las Vegas (4)Cosmopolitan Las Vegas (5)Cosmopolitan Las Vegas (6)Cosmopolitan Las Vegas (1)Cosmopolitan Las Vegas (7)

Cosmopolitan Las Vegas – Stunning photos of seemingly empty buildings in Vegas by Tim Navis

We turn on the lights

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Photographs portraying New York City during the night; capturing its beautiful illumination. Unknown photographer

Houses of the Holy

 

Houses of the Holy (10)Houses of the Holy (11)Houses of the Holy (12)Houses of the Holy (13)Houses of the Holy (14)Houses of the Holy (15)Houses of the Holy (16)Houses of the Holy (9)

‘Houses of the Holy’ – stunning photographs of colorful vaulted mosque ceilings, captured by Mohammad Reza Domiri Ganji

We find space

 

House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (5)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (3)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (2)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (4)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (1)

House in Fukawa, Japan by ‘Suppose Design Office’

We like geometry

 

Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (2)Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (3)Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (1)

‘Miss Maple’ designed by Elisa Strozyk and photographed by Sebastian Neeb /// Text from the designer’s website:

MISS MAPLE

pendant lamp, 85 x 85 x 35 cm
material: wooden textile, steel

The pendant lamp “Miss Maple” is showing the use of a familiar material in an unconventional way. We usually experience wood as a plain surface, but here it is broken down into a grid of triangles. This makes a flexible lampshade which can be transformed manually in three-dimensional ways.
While the lamp generates warm light at night the surface outside becomes more evident with daylight and turns the lamp into sculptural object.

We are going on holiday

Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (2) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (3) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (4) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (5) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (6) Minimal Greece  Tom Blachford (1)

‘Minimal Greece’ – Rich Blues and Bright Whites from the baron islands of Greece by Tom Blachford

India by Drone

india by drone photography aerial travel 7 india by drone photography aerial travel 6 india by drone photography aerial travel 5 india by drone photography aerial travel 4 india by drone photography aerial travel 3 india by drone photography aerial travel 2 india by drone photography aerial travel 1 A knot of fishing boats at the entrance to Sassoon Dock, Mumbai.

India by Drone – Photographer Amos Chapple’s remarkable aerial views of India were shot by attaching his camera to a ‘quadcopter’ drone

We multi-task

Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (2) Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (3) Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (1)

Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova.

Russian designer Anna Lotova slotted two layers of foam beneath the surface of this wooden desk to create squishy spaces for storing stationery and other objects.

Named Oxymoron Desk, the piece combines two contrasting materials for its tabletop;  two thick layers of upholstered foam are sandwiched between a pair of plywood sheets with curved edges.

A sliced opening along the top plywood sheet exposes the soft layer underneath, creating a place where documents and stationery can be inserted.

“As an architect and designer I know how important it is to have a comfortable and enjoyable work table,” said Lotova. “Oxymoron Desk is a result of interaction between two contradictory materials that enhance each other and gain a new meaning.”

A side table can also be added by slipping an extra piece of plywood between the two cushioned layers on either side of the desk.

An accompanying lamp can also be inserted between the layers, or can be slotted into the top and positioned at different angles. (Text via dezeen.com)

We want a cabin

Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan via Archdaily (2) Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan via Archdaily (3) Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan

Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan by Sou Fujimoto Architects / Photographed by Iwan Baan

 

Words from the architect: I thought of making an ultimate wooden architecture. It was conceived by just mindlessly stacking 350mm square.

Lumber is extremely versatile. In an ordinary wooden architecture, lumber is effectively differentiated according to functions in various localities precisely because it is so versatile. Columns, beams, foundations, exterior walls, interior walls, ceilings, floorings, insulations, furnishings, stairs, window frames, meaning all. However, I thought if lumber is indeed so versatile then why not create architecture by one rule that fulfills all of these functions. I envisioned the creation of new spatiality that preserves primitive conditions of a harmonious entity before various functions and roles differentiated.

There are no separations of floor, wall, and ceiling here. A place that one thought was a floor becomes a chair, a ceiling, a wall from various positions. The floor levels are relative and spatiality is perceived differently according to one’s position. Here, people are distributed three-dimensionally in the space. This is a place like an amorphous landscape with a new experience of various senses of distances. Inhabitants discover, rather than being prescribed, various functionalities in these convolutions.

This bungalow no longer fits the category of wooden architecture. If wooden architecture is merely something made from wood, then wood itself surpasses the architectural procedures to directly become a “place where people live” in this bungalow. It is of an existence akin to primitive conditions before architecture. Rather than just a new architecture, this is a new origin, a new existence.

Metropolis

Reflexiones - Examples of contemporary architecture in the cities of Madrid, Santiago de Compostela, Avilés, Bilbao by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich From the series: Reflexiones - Examples of contemporary architecture in Spain and the UAE by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich From the series: Reflexiones - Examples of contemporary architecture in Spain and the UAE by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich From the series: Reflexiones - Examples of contemporary architecture in Spain and the UAE by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich

From the series: Reflexiones – Examples of contemporary architecture in Spain and the UAE by Berlin based photographer Matthias Heiderich

We need cover

Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (4) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (6) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (2) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (3) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (5)

Beautiful photographs of the very elegant racetrack stands of the Zarzuela Hippodrome (1935) in Madrid, Spain, by architects Carlos Arniches and Martín Dominguez, and engineer Eduardo Torroja / photographed by Ximo Michavila.

Herringbone

Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan12 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan11 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan10 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan9 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan8 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan7 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan6 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan5 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan4 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan3 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan2 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan1

The beautiful ‘Herringbone House’ by London based Atelier ChanChan in Islington, London. Photographs by Mike Tsang.

Words from the architect:

The house aims to relate to its context by taking the syntax of the local vernacular: namely gable ended roofs and the brick material of the Victorian terraces. However, the open plan interiors with ceiling to floor windows, skylights and courtyards are supported by a modern steel structure.

The combination making for a modern vernacular house inspired by the old to create something new. The ornamental herringbone brickwork was used to create personal expression and to articulate the picture windows and volumes by using framing, pattern and variety in the laying of the bricks.

We are going to court

From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts:From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts: From his series 'Courts' by photographer Ward Roberts:

From his series ‘Courts’ by photographer Ward Roberts:

Sports courts are subjects to extremes: battered by the stomps and slams of players or else left in silence. These days, much of the beauty and pathos of courts lies in their minimalist sentiment. In their deserted state they become sculptural, attracting the eye of the photographer or painter more than the player. As Ward’s photographs show us, we easily sympathize with the treatment of such venues that are developed purely for our use and occasionally attract abuse. The only evidence of action you’ll see on many outdoor courts nowadays is the handy work of amateur graffiti ‘artists’. For many, the attraction to healthy recreational activities has been superseded by faster, louder viewing experiences. The humble local court has been neglected in preference to the stadium, which delivers sport as spectacle with staples like pre-match entertainment, merchandise and a bar. The surrounding buildings that feature in many of Ward’s images give us another clue as to where all the playing action has gone – indoors. Text by Ward Roberts

Tree House

Tree House by 6a architects (7) Tree House by 6a architects (6) Tree House by 6a architects (5) Tree House by 6a architects (4) Tree House by 6a architects (3) Tree House by 6a architects (2) Tree House by 6a architects

‘Tree House’ by London based architecture studio 6a Architects // Photography by Johan Dehlin.

London studio 6a Architects has extended the home of architecture critic Rowan Moore and his family by adding a timber structure that curves around a tree (+ slideshow). The extension was designed by 6a Architects to provide a new ground-floor bedroom and bathroom for the London house, which is an amalgamation of two cottages constructed in the 1830s. A ramped corridor runs parallel to the existing house, negotiating a gentle change in level and allowing access for the mother of the family, who uses a wheelchair. This corridor connects the house’s living room with the new bedroom suite, which extends out into the garden. The exterior of the structure is clad with reclaimed timber, while white-painted timber panels line the interior walls. Glazed doors open the space out to a curving timber deck that surrounds the sumac tree and steps down to the garden. (Text via dezeen)

We stay where we are

Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague. Beautiful photographs from the series 'Limbo' by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:  Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague.

Beautiful photographs from the series ‘Limbo’ by South African photographer Dillon Marsh. Words from his website:

Limbo is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague.

We aim

Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (2) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (5) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (8) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (3) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (6) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (9) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (4) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried (7) Bowling Alleys By Robert Götzfried

From his series ‘Bowling Alleys’ by Robert Götzfried  – another intriguing example of how great photography can give artistic beauty to the most unlikeliest of places.

We carve out

The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown phootgrapher The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown phootgrapher The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown phootgrapher The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown phootgrapher

The Church of St. George is one of eleven monolithic churches in Lalibela, a city in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. Originally named Roha or Warwar, this historical and religious site is currently accepted in the modern name of Lalibela, after King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of Ethiopia, who is regarded as a saint-like figure by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. / Text via Wikipedia, unknown photographer

Slippery Slope

Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters.

House K by world renowned Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto / photographs by Iwan Baan, text by designboom:

Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters.

Mum’s Place

Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)  Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)

A wonderful example of beautiful simplicity – a corrugated aluminum ‘house for mother’ in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)

‘House for mother’ by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF), is located in linköping, sweden, and is part of the linköpingsbo 2017 housing exhibition. the dwelling is divided into two parallel volumes slightly shifted from each other, thus creating spaces both in front of and behind the building. oriented to a park in the north, and an alley in the south, the two adjacent gables emphasize the overall theme for the area in general: narrow plots and a variation of housing types. the first form contains the kitchen, dining room and living room, with the bathroom and laundry room housed in a smaller cabin within the structure. the second volume, partly in two levels with a less inclined roof, accommodates  the bedrooms and a small studio. the façades and roof are covered with raw, corrugated aluminum in juxtaposition to the warm interior with an exposed timber structure and walls lined with plywood. the polished concrete flooring folds up along the perimeter of the building and transforms into a bench and shelf. (Text via designboom.com / all images courtesy of förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)