We spin

Jan Leonardo Wöllert (previously) is a German photographer who started his career by specializing in nighttime pictures and has since shifted his focus to the field of light art performance (3) Jan Leonardo Wöllert (previously) is a German photographer who started his career by specializing in nighttime pictures and has since shifted his focus to the field of light art performance (4) Jan Leonardo Wöllert (previously) is a German photographer who started his career by specializing in nighttime pictures and has since shifted his focus to the field of light art performance (5) Jan Leonardo Wöllert (previously) is a German photographer who started his career by specializing in nighttime pictures and has since shifted his focus to the field of light art performance (6) Jan Leonardo Wöllert (previously) is a German photographer who started his career by specializing in nighttime pictures and has since shifted his focus to the field of light art performance (7) Jan Leonardo Wöllert (previously) is a German photographer who started his career by specializing in nighttime pictures and has since shifted his focus to the field of light art performance (8) Jan Leonardo Wöllert (previously) is a German photographer who started his career by specializing in nighttime pictures and has since shifted his focus to the field of light art performance (9) Jan Leonardo Wöllert (previously) is a German photographer who started his career by specializing in nighttime pictures and has since shifted his focus to the field of light art performance (1)

Light Art Photography by Electrical Movements in the Dark (EMD).

We are trapped

Meshology by Sven Hauth & Dimitri Daniloff (2) Meshology by Sven Hauth & Dimitri Daniloff (3) Meshology by Sven Hauth & Dimitri Daniloff (4) Meshology by Sven Hauth & Dimitri Daniloff (5) Meshology by Sven Hauth & Dimitri Daniloff (6) Meshology by Sven Hauth & Dimitri Daniloff (7) Meshology by Sven Hauth & Dimitri Daniloff (8) Meshology by Sven Hauth & Dimitri Daniloff (1)

Meshology by Dimitri Daniloff & Sven Hauth

French photographer Dimitri Daniloff and German CG artist Sven Hauth worked in collaboration to create this series of photo manipulations entitled “Meshology”.

We see 3D

3D street art by Edgar Mueller (2) 3D street art by Edgar Mueller (3) 3D street art by Edgar Mueller

ARCHE_20_09_2013-11_29_42-10794

3D street art by German artist Edgar Mueller

We tape

Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (2) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (3) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (4) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (5) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (6) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (7) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (8) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (9) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (10) Masking Tape Street Art Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourn, only create with masking tape. Creation’s size and geometry really tell us about the volume of masking tape and work (1)

Masking Tape Street Art by Australian street artist Buff Diss based in Melbourne.

We are coloured

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

Humanae/ Angelica Dass/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

Humanae/ Angelica Dass/ Humanae/ Angelica Dass/ Humanae/ Angelica Dass/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

Humanae by Angelica Dass

Words from the photographer:

Humanæ  is a chromatic inventory, a project that reflects on the colors beyond the borders of our codes by referencing the PANTONE® color scheme.

The project development is based on a series of portraits whose background is dyed with the exact Pantone® tone extracted from a sample of 11×11 pixels of the portrayed´s face. The project’s objective is to record and catalog all possible human skin tones.

Humanæ it’s a pursuit for highlighting our subtle-continuous of our tones that make more equality than difference… our true colors, rather than the untrue Red and Yellow, Black and White. It is a kind of game for subverting our codes. The audience is free to read into it. The ultimate goal is to provoke and bring currently using internet as a discussion platform on ethnic identity, creating images that lead us to match us independent from factors such as nationality, origin, economic status, age or aesthetic standards.

(All the portrayed are volunteers, people who approach to the project, visit the space in which I am portraying and decide to participate on their own by a Internet call on the Facebook page, on Tumblr , using public spaces in Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Winterthur, Bergen, Daegu,Addis Ababa, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paris and Chicago)
(PANTONE® Guides are one of the main classification systems of colors, which are represented by an alphanumeric code, allowing to accurately recreate any of them in any media. It is a technical industrial standard often called Real Color)

Our heads are spinning

Florencia Durante Envelopment series (1) Florencia Durante Envelopment series (2) Florencia Durante Envelopment series (3) Florencia Durante Envelopment series (4) Florencia Durante Envelopment series (5)

From the series ‘Envelopment’ – Incredible light art photography by Florencia Durante

We craft

ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (1) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (2) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (3) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (4) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (5) ARTS&CRAFTS BY DIEGO QUEROL 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol -  Personal project trying to play with colors and textures to create a nice atmosphere (6)

‘ARTS & CRAFTS’ by 3D Digital Artist Diego Querol

We are tempted

© Jens Kristian Balle 2012, www.jenskristianballe.com Temptations Vancouver native Jens Kristian Balle explores peoples desire to do something, especially something wrong in the series “temptations” (3) © Jens Kristian Balle 2012, www.jenskristianballe.com © Jens Kristian Balle 2012, www.jenskristianballe.com © Jens Kristian Balle 2012, www.jenskristianballe.com

Temptations –  by photographer Jens Kristian Balle

temptation – a desire to do something, esp. something wrong or unwise.

Keeping this definition in mind the conceptual Temptations series was created fixating on the negative lifestyle habits and addictions of humans around the world. Though the theme is dark the series is kept light-hearted, full of bright colours and carefully styled objects to match.
The series itself was made to make people smile, but of course, it also has a message to maybe get a few people to think twice about their lifestyle choices, or in a funny way to reinforce what people probably already know. (text via dodho.com)

We could have a burger

Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. Slow Wood was in the kitchen of KidsRoomZoom during the 2011Fu (2) Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. Slow Wood was in the kitchen of KidsRoomZoom during the 2011Fu (3) Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. Slow Wood was in the kitchen of KidsRoomZoom during the 2011Fu (4) Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. Slow Wood was in the kitchen of KidsRoomZoom during the 2011Fu (1)

SLOW WOOD by Studio Fludd // Slow Wood is a handmade prototype for unconventional sandwiches far from the mass catering. To find out more, visit their website here

We make faces

Toon Bombing A Toronto Artist Turns Outdoor Objects into Googly-Eyed Faces (3) Toon Bombing A Toronto Artist Turns Outdoor Objects into Googly-Eyed Faces (2) Toon Bombing A Toronto Artist Turns Outdoor Objects into Googly-Eyed Faces (4) Toon Bombing A Toronto Artist Turns Outdoor Objects into Googly-Eyed Faces (5) Toon Bombing A Toronto Artist Turns Outdoor Objects into Googly-Eyed Faces (1)

Toon Bombing – Toronto based artist Aiden Glynn turns outdoor objects into googly-eyed faces

We recycle

reyes-3 reyes-4 reyes-5 reyes-6

Mexico City based artist Pedro Reyes fabricates 50 functional music instruments from destroyed drug war weapons. He acquired some 6,700 weapons that were scheduled to be buried (as is customary in mass weapon disposals) and instead collaborated with six musicians to create 50 working instruments as part of a statement regarding increased gun violence in Mexico. The numerous firearms were cut down, welded and formed into a variety of string, wind, and percussion instruments over a period of two weeks last month. Via his blog Reyes says:

It’s difficult to explain but the transformation was more than physical. It’s important to consider that many lives were taken with these weapons; as if a sort of exorcism was taking place the music expelled the demons they held, as well as being a requiem for lives lost. […] This is also a call to action, since we cannot stop the violence only at the place where the weapons are being used, but also where they are made. There is a disparity between visible and invisible violence. The nearly 80,000 deaths by gun-shot that have occurred in Mexico in the last 6 years, or the school shootings in the US are the visible side of violence. The invisible side is that one of gun trade-shows, neglecting assault rifle bans, and shareholder profit from public companies. This is a large industry of death and suffering for which no cultural rejection is expressed.Guns continue to be depicted as something sexy both in Hollywood and in videogames; there may be actors who won’t smoke on the screen, but there has not been one who would reject the role of a trigger-happy hero.

We want to hide

Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (2) Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (1) Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (3)

Kimiko Yoshida – The Mao Bride. Self Portrait, 2009

We need some grooming

Will it beard by a non-fearless tumblr project (2) Will it beard by a non-fearless tumblr project (3) Will it beard by a non-fearless tumblr project (4) Will it beard by a non-fearless tumblr project (5) Will it beard by a non-fearless tumblr project (1)

Will It Beard – Pierce Thiot and his wife Stacy Thiot have created a bizarre Tumblr called Will It Beard, which is devoted entirely to the couple sticking things into Pierce’s beard and photographing the results.

Shaving razors, lollipops, uncooked noodles, cocktail umbrellas and, yes, even lit matches, they have tried it all.

We got a haircut

the indian city of bikaner host an annual camel festival in january. the designs are the results of trimming and dying the camel hair. photos steve hoge and osakabe yasuo (2) the indian city of bikaner host an annual camel festival in january. the designs are the results of trimming and dying the camel hair. photos steve hoge and osakabe yasuo (3) the indian city of bikaner host an annual camel festival in january. the designs are the results of trimming and dying the camel hair. photos steve hoge and osakabe yasuo (4) the indian city of bikaner host an annual camel festival in january. the designs are the results of trimming and dying the camel hair. photos steve hoge and osakabe yasuo (1) the indian city of bikaner host an annual camel festival in january. the designs are the results of trimming and dying the camel hair. photos steve hoge and osakabe yasuo (5) the indian city of bikaner host an annual camel festival in january. the designs are the results of trimming and dying the camel hair. photos steve hoge and osakabe yasuo (1)

The Indian city of Bikaner hosts an annual camel festival in January. The designs are the results of trimming and dying the camel hair. Photographs by Steve Hoge and Osakabe Yasuo.

We light up

James Turrell James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (3) James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (4) James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (5) James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (6) James Turrell Aten Reign, 2013 (1)

‘Aten Reign’ by light artist James Turrell’s, in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York.

We are a mazed

Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (2) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (3) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (4) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (5) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (6) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (1)

A giant 60-foot maze at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C created by Danish architects BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group

We take a breath

John Franzen - Each Line One Breath (2) John Franzen - Each Line One Breath (3) John Franzen - Each Line One Breath (4) John Franzen - Each Line One Breath (5) John Franzen - Each Line One Breath (6) John Franzen - Each Line One Breath (1)

“Each Line One Breath” is a series of meditative drawings by artist John Franzen. He calls them morphogenetic freehand drawings.

He starts with a straight line all the way down a page, and then slowly draws another line beside it. He tries his best to copy the line exactly but inevitably there are tiny imperfections. These “mistakes” are amplified as he copies each new line, and the drawing begins to reveal itself like a curtain. (text via booooom.com)

We need to cook

Cut Food by Beth Galton and Charlotte Omnes (2) Cut Food by Beth Galton and Charlotte Omnes (3) Cut Food by Beth Galton and Charlotte Omnes (4) Cut Food by Beth Galton and Charlotte Omnes

‘Cut Food’ by Beth Galton and Charlotte Omnes /

Photographer Beth Galton and food stylist Charlotte Omnes have created a fantastic ‘Cut Food’ exhibition – a set of mesmerizing photographs of everyday foods and drinks sliced neatly in half. Some of the food items are relatively straight forward to cut cleanly in half, while others, like the ‘iced’ soda have to be set in gelatin first in order to solidify the liquid.

We are scratching the surface

Tony Orrico - Penwald Drawings (3) Tony Orrico - Penwald Drawings (5) Tony Orrico - Penwald Drawings (7) Tony Orrico - Penwald Drawings (2) Tony Orrico - Penwald Drawings (4) Tony Orrico - Penwald Drawings (6) Tony Orrico - Penwald Drawings

Penwald Drawings by Tony Orrico. Tony is an artist and dancer who has been called the human spirograph, performing for up to 4 hours continuously taking the concept to the next level by using his entire body in the drawing process.

We are small

fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (9) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (8) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (2) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (5) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (9) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (3) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (6) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (10) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (4) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography (7) fiddleoak– Miniature Photography

We feel squeezed

Soft Light by Simon Frambach (2) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (3) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (4) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (5) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (1)

Soft Light by Simon Frambach /

You lay down in bed to read for a few minutes. You need both a night light for reading and a pillow to life your head. In the creative mind of Simon Frambach, that combination is one. Simon created a inventive new way to create light and rest by combing polyurethane foam and a lightbulb with a protective cage. The soft white polyurethane foam turns the harsh bright light into a warm glow that you can stuff anywhere. You can tuck the light under  your head and use if as a pillow. Jam the light in a small spot where it stays nestled in place providing you with a little extra light for reading or play. (via induldg.com)

We are having fish

Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard Makes Art Out of Fishes (2) Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard Makes Art Out of Fishes (3) Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard Makes Art Out of Fishes (4) Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard Makes Art Out of Fishes (5) Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard Makes Art Out of Fishes (6)

Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard makes art out of fish. The Paris-born artist uses market-fresh fish to create her wacky scenes. After she is done photographing, she cooks and eats them.

“It is the perfect recycling of art. Nothing is left over – and I can live from it”

We drink coffee

Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (2)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (3)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (4)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (5)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (6)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (1)

Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee

We want to disappear

woman-holding-mirror-on-grass-reflection

‘Invisible’ – great creative photograph by talented 18 year old Laura Williams, from Cambridge, UK

We stick together

Maple saplings, 70' highstickwork sculptures by patrick dougherty (5)stickwork sculptures by patrick dougherty (2)stickwork sculptures by patrick dougherty (4)stickwork sculptures by patrick dougherty

Fantastic ‘Stickwork’ sculptures by American artist Patrick Dougherty

We explore

Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (2)Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (3)Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (4)Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (5)Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (6)Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (7)Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (8)Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space

From the series ‘Outer Space’  by photographer Thomas Rusch who since 2012 participates and follows the “outer space” project of Berlin based artist Michael Najjar.

We are stuck in traffic

Misty Traffic Lights in Germany Photographed by Lucas Zimmermann (2)Misty Traffic Lights in Germany Photographed by Lucas Zimmermann (3)Misty Traffic Lights in Germany Photographed by Lucas Zimmermann (4)Misty Traffic Lights in Germany Photographed by Lucas Zimmermann (1)

In shades of electric blue, ruby red and black and white, photographer Lucas Zimmermann transforms mundane traffic lights in Weimar, Germany into an enchanting light show. The project is simple in concept, but absolutely beautiful in execution. ‘Traffic Lights’ was captured late at night on a foggy, vacant intersection. Lucas Zimmermann created the pictures taking 5-20 second long exposures. As all the colours and lights melt together, your eye is drawn further and further into the photographs.

Broken Home

Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (2)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (3)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (4)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (1)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (5)

Installation of miniature houses by Savona and Milan based artist Daniele Del Nero from the “Brockenhaus” series. Using black paper, Del Nero constructs architectural scale models of deserted towns. To create the effect of neglect and abandonment, the artist covers the black paper with construction paste and flour.

In his artist statement, Del Nero writes, “My purpose is to talk about the sense of time and destiny of the planet after the human species, through the sense of restlessness which abandoned buildings are able to communicate.”

We connect

Grimanesa Amoros (3) Grimanesa Amoros (5) Grimanesa Amoros (2) Grimanesa Amoros (4) Grimanesa Amoros

‘Golden Connection’ – light installation in the Four Seasons Hotel for the Art Basel Show in Hong Kong, 2013 by artist Grimanese Amoros

Wallflower

Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (2) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (3) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (4) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (5) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (6) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes (2) Photoperformances Landscapes, Cecilia Paredes

In her series ‘Landscapes’ – Peruvian artist Cecilia Paredes Peruvian has mastered the art of camouflage and by using body paint is able to disappear into her surroundings. With the help of her assistants, she paints herself into the background of floral wallpapers. Her dark hair and the whites of the eyes are often the only thing that shows there’s a person hiding.

However, her series called “Landscapes” doesn’t just create a disappearance illusion, it also shows Paredes’ quest for belonging.

“The theme behind all is re-location after displacement and migration and how one has to adjust in order to belong. Tough it is, but it has to be done, without forgetting our origin. The theme behind all is re-location after displacement and migration and how one has to adjust in order to belong. Tough it is, but it has to be done, without forgetting our origin.”

(via demilked.com)

 

We are one in a million

One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (2) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (3) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (4) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (5) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (1)

‘One million stars’  – art installation by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos.

In short, The Million Stars project is an international weaving art project sparked by a personal repsonse to a local tragedy…” read more here

Rainbow Room

Pierre Le Riche (5) Pierre Le Riche (3) Pierre Le Riche (2) Pierre Le Riche (4) Pierre Le Richerainbow room1 rainbow room

‘The rainbow room’ – an installation on homo-sexuality by Pierre le Riche.

The ‘rainbow room’ installation by cape town-based designer pierre le riche takes a critical look at the sociological implications of afrikaner masculine hegemony on homosexuality in post-apartheid south africa. The intervention, built from 17km of acrylic thread in colours of the gay pride flag, represents a traditional afrikaan family living room in the midst of the 1995 rugby world cup final match displayed on a television; an incredibly significant point in south african history, and perhaps the last chance the afrikaner male had to ‘prove his superiority’. Through an implementation of colorful and playful yarn bombs onto traditional pieces of furniture and over 150 rugby balls, the concept of homosexuality and masculinity is juxtaposed, questioning the acceptance of same-sex relations. (text via designboom)

We feel bubbly

tomoya matsuura conveys mystery with ‘conduction’ bubble art (2) tomoya matsuura conveys mystery with ‘conduction’ bubble art (3) OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAbubble

Incredible bubble art by Japanese artist Tomoya Matsuura.

In this installation, which he calls ‘Conduction’, the young artist physically put “countless” bubbles on a thread and took photographs of it. This resultant object, made of bubbles, keeps changing constantly due to changes in temperature, humidity and the timing of the photograph. After some retouching of the raw material in the photographs, this is what he ended up with. (via visualdisobedience.com)

We make moves

Got Chess (2015) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2016) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2017) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2018) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2014) by Peter Baeten

Flat design meets Moleskine notebooks meets… chess.

Inspired by classic leather notebooks, this pared-back chess set is gorgeous in its simplicity and execution. Belgian designer Peter Baeten has channelled his love of classic leather notebooks into this beautiful minimal chess set.

“By working with the silhouettes of the pieces, it walks the line between 2D and 3D. Because of this, only the ones who are playing have a complete overview of the pieces on the board. Bystanders will have to do with seeing lines move around on the board,” Baeten explains.

“The set is lasercut and hand varnished, so the natural wood grains remain visible. It contains 4 tablets and a leather cover which also serves as a pad to play on. There are no screws, hinges, glue, or any other type of materials used, therefore there is no assembly necessary, and each single piece can easily be replaced.”

(text via creativeblog.com)

We had an important day

The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (2) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (3) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (4) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (5) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (6) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (7) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (8) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (1)

The Mini Book of Life’s Major Events by artist Evan Lorenzen

We need an umbrella

A Colorful Canopy of Umbrellas Returns to the Streets of Agueda, Portugal (2) A Colorful Canopy of Umbrellas Returns to the Streets of Agueda, Portugal (3) A Colorful Canopy of Umbrellas Returns to the Streets of Agueda, Portugal (4) A Colorful Canopy of Umbrellas Returns to the Streets of Agueda, Portugal (1)

Beautiful photographs of the colorful canopy of umbrellas once again returning to the streets of Agueda, Portugal in  July 2013 / captured by Patrícia Almeida

We are a bit dizzy

LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (5) LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (4) LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (3) LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (2) LIGHT RORSCHACH - LIGHT PAINTING BY NICOLAS RIVALS (1)

Light Rorschach“, a series of photographs of Nicolas Rivals mixing abstract portraits, reflections in water and light painting to give us some beautiful light Rorschach tests… “A Light Painting work that let everyone see his own representation of what is in the picture. The aesthetics of melting metal associated with the symmetry of reflection in the water causes the viewer to question the reality of these photographs…” (Text via Ufunk.net)

Flower Power

Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (2) Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (3) Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (1)

‘Table for a Flower’ by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem

Skyscapes

This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. (Text by Juxtapox.com)

Wonderful color photographs by Eric Cahan.

This photographic series by New York photographer Eric Cahan was created by adding filters with a variety of cameras that are both film and digital. Influenced by the California light and space movement, Cahan is interested in achieving an experience of light and color that is seamless and that transcends reality, much like his predecessors like Turrell in the 1960s. Through repetitive printing and filtering, Cahan eventually achieves these finished skyscapes that feel simultaneously surreal and hyper-real, revealing the seemingly magical phenomenon of light as we might experience it ourselves, but as many photographs fail to capture. (Text by Juxtapox.com)

360

360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-17 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-18 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-16 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-15 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-11 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-12 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-10 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-9 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-8 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-5 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-4 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-2 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-1 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-3360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (2) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (3) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (4) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (5) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (1)

Amazing 360 degree storybooks by Japanese artist and architect Yusuke Oono who has designed a fantastic series of 40-page books that fan out into 360-degree carousels, each page laser-cut and bound from Yusuke’s digital design.

We grow

Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra

Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra

The secret life of Elgin Park

Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.  Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.  Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.             Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.

Welcome to the City of Elgin Park.

Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.

As a professional model maker, Smith’s models are detailed enough to withstand the scrutiny of close-up photography. Smith places them in miniature dioramas and uses forced perspective to make parts of the real world lend his pictures additional realism. The result is a quirky sort of historical fiction – faithfully and authentically reproduced scenes from a small American town that never actually happened (but could have).

What’s also great about his Elgin Park collection is that the magician is willing to reveal his secrets. Smith’s Flickr gallery often pairs his brilliant illusions with a picture that breaks their carefully arranged perspective and reveals how he managed to blend reality and his imagined history. His pictures are an excellent example of how art can be used to fool the eyes.

Source: Michael Paul Smith (via boredpanda.com

We have a sense of humour

artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (1) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (8) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (7) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (6)artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (2) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (3)artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (5) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (4)

Humorous artworks using a variety of different media by artist Ole Ukena.

We orbit

'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. Tomas Saraceno - In Orbit (2013 (4) Tomas Saraceno - In Orbit (2013 (5) 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication.

‘In Orbit’ ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.

Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.

Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:

This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication.

Text Via colossal / All photographs © Studio Saraceno & Kunstsammlung NRW

Dot Dot Dot

“I’m Here, but Nothing” - black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil. “I’m Here, but Nothing” - black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil. Yayoi Kusama - I’m Here But Nothing (2000-11) (4) “I’m Here, but Nothing” - black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil. “I’m Here, but Nothing” - black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil.

“I’m Here, but Nothing” – black light art exhibition by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 2000 using fluorescent sticker spots to fill an ordinary living room, giving the impression of a world seen through a magical, hallucinatory veil.

We want to explore

A map of the world made out of recycled computer parts by UK based artist Susan Stockwell A map of the world made out of recycled computer parts by UK based artist Susan Stockwell A map of the world made out of recycled computer parts by UK based artist Susan Stockwell A map of the world made out of recycled computer parts by UK based artist Susan Stockwell A map of the world made out of recycled computer parts by UK based artist Susan Stockwell A map of the world made out of recycled computer parts by UK based artist Susan Stockwell A map of the world made out of recycled computer parts by UK based artist Susan Stockwell

A map of the world made out of recycled computer parts by UK based artist Susan Stockwell

We spin

United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (1) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (2) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (3) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (4) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (5) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (6) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (7) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (8)

From the exhibition: “Momentum’ by United Visual Artists currently on display at The Curve, Barbican Center, London /

Words from the Barbican website:

Our internal model of time, movement, mass and space is based on a lifetime of experience, perhaps even genetically encoded. What happens when we build a new model? What happens when we bend the rules?’ UVA

United Visual Artists invites you to experience Momentum, a carefully choreographed sequence of light, sound and movement, which responds to the unique space of the Curve.

Momentum consists of twelve pendulums that activate light and sound as they swing, drawing attention to the Curve’s vast arc, inviting you to journey through the space guided by your heightened senses. Each pendulum has been meticulously designed and built using steel, aluminium, and custom electronics. The sound is individual to each pendulum, prepared and tuned to seamlessly resonate as they move within the Curve.

Momentum creates an environment that has its foundations in detailed research, sophisticated computer technology and mechanical expertise. Yet, the effect is to create a space that feels wondrously transformed, one which you are invited to experience and explore.

We are surrounded

a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (1) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (2) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (3) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (4) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (5) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (6)

‘A-art house’ by designed by Japanese architect Kazuyo Sejima (of the Japanese studio SANAA) in collaboration with Yuko Hasegawa (chief curator of Tokyo’s Museum of Contemporary Art) for the Inujima art house project inI nujima, Japan / Photographed by Iwan Baan

We want to sail away

Sail Away - a constantly expanding, large-scale installation in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in London, consisting of hundreds of small boats made from paper money bills, maps and tickets from all around the world.  by artist Susan Stockwell Sail Away - a constantly expanding, large-scale installation in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in London, consisting of hundreds of small boats made from paper money bills, maps and tickets from all around the world.  by artist Susan Stockwell Sail Away - a constantly expanding, large-scale installation in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in London, consisting of hundreds of small boats made from paper money bills, maps and tickets from all around the world.  by artist Susan Stockwell Sail Away - a constantly expanding, large-scale installation in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in London, consisting of hundreds of small boats made from paper money bills, maps and tickets from all around the world.  by artist Susan StockwellSail Away - a constantly expanding, large-scale installation in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in London, consisting of hundreds of small boats made from paper money bills, maps and tickets from all around the world.  by artist Susan Stockwell Sail Away - a constantly expanding, large-scale installation in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in London, consisting of hundreds of small boats made from paper money bills, maps and tickets from all around the world.  by artist Susan Stockwell

Sail Away – a constantly expanding, large-scale installation in the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern in London, consisting of hundreds of small boats made from paper money bills, maps and tickets from all around the world by artist Susan Stockwell

This post is part of our second Theme Week where since last Friday, you the public had the chance to choose between 5 themes/inspirations for each post this week. Yet again you chose probably the most challenging theme we had listed: ‘Miniature’ Hope you enjoy… :)

We are super heroes

Batman Rémi Noël (2) Batman Rémi Noël (3) Batman Rémi Noël (4) Batman Rémi Noël (5)TinyBatman08 TinyBatman06 Batman Rémi Noël (6) Batman Rémi Noël (7) Batman Rémi Noël (8) Batman Rémi Noël (1)

The secret life of miniature batman – French artist and photographer Rémi Noël takes a classic ‘Batman’ 1989 movie action figure on a tour of the American Southwest in a fun and surprisingly moving photography series.

This post is part of our second Theme Week where since last Friday, you the public had the chance to choose between 5 themes/inspirations for each post this week. Yet again you chose probably the most challenging theme we had listed: ‘Miniature’ Hope you enjoy… :)