Panoramic View

An old residential building is seen surrounded by a newly-built ring viaduct, in Guangzhou

An old residential building is seen surrounded by a newly-built ring viaduct, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, June 18, 2015. The building was planned to be demolished, but several units in the building refused to move out as they couldn’t reach a compensation agreement with the authority, local media reported. Picture via REUTERS/Ma Qiang/Southern Metropolis Daily

Flower Power

Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (6) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (5) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (4) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (3)Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (1) Luoping Rape Flower Fields, Yunnan Province, China / photographed by +Lanzi These sparkling images, that look more like a golden ocean, are of yellow rapeseed flowers, also known as canola, attract thousands of tourists every year (during the blossoming season) to Luoping, a small county in eastern China.

We are city dwellers

Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (1) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (2) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (3) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (4) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (5) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (6) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (7) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (8) Bence Bakonyi. Urbanite (9)

In a surreal blend of day and night, Budapest-based photographer Bence Bakonyi’s series “Urbanite” features vast cityscapes seemingly devoid of people. Shot in Hong Kong and Shanghai, the series presents settings in which the presence of humanity is eerily close, as though the population had suddenly fled, leaving lights on and laundry on the line.Bakonyi’s artist statement describes the series’ intended effect upon its audience; “The ‘Urbanite’ series is an account of how the artist found his home in the unknown. We can see the city as it is presented by the photographer, but also the artist who is in turn brought closer to us by China.” (text via fstoppers.com)

We want to hide

Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (2) Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (1) Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (3)

Kimiko Yoshida – The Mao Bride. Self Portrait, 2009

Yellow Sea

Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (2) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (3) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (4) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (5) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (6) Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China (1)

Ocean of Flowers in Luoping, China / unknown photographer(s)

We have a lot to do

In his series 'Totems' set in Shanghai, China french photographer Alain Delorme pays homage to the underdog heroes of the city, migrant bicycle workers lugging around heaps of cargo to keep the ever-expanding city afloat. Delorme turns this real injustice into a surreal circus whereby he digitally alters his photos to better convey his message about the wealth disparity in China.  Hereby the migrants' loads have been digitally retouched and purposefully exaggerated to draw attention to the symbolism within Delorme's work. In addition, the photographer uses candy-coated hues to veer away from reality. In his series 'Totems' set in Shanghai, China french photographer Alain Delorme pays homage to the underdog heroes of the city, migrant bicycle workers lugging around heaps of cargo to keep the ever-expanding city afloat. Delorme turns this real injustice into a surreal circus whereby he digitally alters his photos to better convey his message about the wealth disparity in China.  Hereby the migrants' loads have been digitally retouched and purposefully exaggerated to draw attention to the symbolism within Delorme's work. In addition, the photographer uses candy-coated hues to veer away from reality. In his series 'Totems' set in Shanghai, China french photographer Alain Delorme pays homage to the underdog heroes of the city, migrant bicycle workers lugging around heaps of cargo to keep the ever-expanding city afloat. Delorme turns this real injustice into a surreal circus whereby he digitally alters his photos to better convey his message about the wealth disparity in China.  Hereby the migrants' loads have been digitally retouched and purposefully exaggerated to draw attention to the symbolism within Delorme's work. In addition, the photographer uses candy-coated hues to veer away from reality.In his series 'Totems' set in Shanghai, China french photographer Alain Delorme pays homage to the underdog heroes of the city, migrant bicycle workers lugging around heaps of cargo to keep the ever-expanding city afloat. Delorme turns this real injustice into a surreal circus whereby he digitally alters his photos to better convey his message about the wealth disparity in China.  Hereby the migrants' loads have been digitally retouched and purposefully exaggerated to draw attention to the symbolism within Delorme's work. In addition, the photographer uses candy-coated hues to veer away from reality. In his series 'Totems' set in Shanghai, China french photographer Alain Delorme pays homage to the underdog heroes of the city, migrant bicycle workers lugging around heaps of cargo to keep the ever-expanding city afloat. Delorme turns this real injustice into a surreal circus whereby he digitally alters his photos to better convey his message about the wealth disparity in China.  Hereby the migrants' loads have been digitally retouched and purposefully exaggerated to draw attention to the symbolism within Delorme's work. In addition, the photographer uses candy-coated hues to veer away from reality. In his series 'Totems' set in Shanghai, China french photographer Alain Delorme pays homage to the underdog heroes of the city, migrant bicycle workers lugging around heaps of cargo to keep the ever-expanding city afloat. Delorme turns this real injustice into a surreal circus whereby he digitally alters his photos to better convey his message about the wealth disparity in China.  Hereby the migrants' loads have been digitally retouched and purposefully exaggerated to draw attention to the symbolism within Delorme's work. In addition, the photographer uses candy-coated hues to veer away from reality.

In his series ‘Totems’ set in Shanghai, China French photographer Alain Delorme pays homage to the underdog heroes of the city, migrant bicycle workers lugging around heaps of cargo to keep the ever-expanding city afloat. Delorme turns this real injustice into a surreal circus whereby he digitally alters his photos to better convey his message about the wealth disparity in China.

Hereby the migrants’ loads have been digitally retouched and purposefully exaggerated to draw attention to the symbolism within Delorme’s work. In addition, the photographer uses candy-coated hues to veer away from reality.

Toy Story

The REAL Toy Story  Michael Wolf (2) The REAL Toy Story  Michael Wolf (3) The REAL Toy Story  Michael Wolf (4) The REAL Toy Story  Michael Wolf (5) The REAL Toy Story  Michael Wolf (6) The REAL Toy Story  Michael Wolf (7) The REAL Toy Story  Michael Wolf (8) The REAL Toy Story  Michael Wolf (9) In his series 'The Real Toy Story' photographer Michael Wolf captures the truth behind made in China stickers. The series exposes the viewer to row after row of anonymous faces, but it's effective enough just to see that there are actual people behind the knickknacks rather than a succession of robotic machines.Interspersed within the wide shots of the factory are intimate portraits of laborers, giving even more of a human feel to the series. Though Wolf's project is, at times, depressing, especially when you think about all the hard work these people put into their livelihood everyday without much acknowledgement, it is also eye-opening and insightful. It is through the photographer's journalistic eye and his decision to share their faces and work environment that they are finally given some much deserved recognition.michaelwolftherealtoystory16 michaelwolftherealtoystory15 michaelwolftherealtoystory13 michaelwolftherealtoystory8 michaelwolftherealtoystory4 michaelwolftherealtoystory5 michaelwolftherealtoystory6

In his series ‘The Real Toy Story’ photographer Michael Wolf captures the truth behind made in China stickers. The series exposes the viewer to row after row of anonymous faces, but it’s effective enough just to see that there are actual people behind the knickknacks rather than a succession of robotic machines. Interspersed within the wide shots of the factory are intimate portraits of laborers, giving even more of a human feel to the series. Though Wolf’s project is, at times, depressing, especially when you think about all the hard work these people put into their livelihood everyday without much acknowledgement, it is also eye-opening and insightful. It is through the photographer’s journalistic eye and his decision to share their faces and work environment that they are finally given some much deserved recognition. (text by my modern met)

We move

The Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, Chengdu, China designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN ZhonghaiThe Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, Chengdu, China designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN Zhonghai The Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, Chengdu, China designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN Zhonghai The Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, Chengdu, China designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN Zhonghai

The Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, , designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN Zhonghai

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We are full

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In his ‘Architecture of Density’ photo series, German photographer Michael Wolf explores the incredible urban landscapes of Hong Kong. Stripped of all outer context like sky or ground, his photos only show fragments of massive blocks of flats, both crumbling or still in construction. The way their monotone and repetitive details occupy the whole frame is mesmerizing, and makes you think about all the walls we build around ourselves. (via demilked)/ for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook or visit us on Pinterest

We let it grow

We have a long way to go

'The Great Wall at Dawn' - the Great Wall of China

‘The Great Wall at Dawn’ – the Great Wall of China, captured by Dublin based architectural and performance photographer Ste Murray

 

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We hang on by a thread

china landscape photography beijing great wall place to visit history amazing nature river dam dynasty garden mountains secrete places

Beautiful photograph of the colorful cable cars of Long Qing Xia Canyon, 50 miles north of Beijing, China captured by Jessica Gunawan Albindo

At the entrance to Long Qing is a village named Gu Cheng Cun, which was the empress’ garden during the Ming dynasty. Long means dragon and Qing means honor or celebrate, Xia means gorge. The legend says that dragons go there to celebrate because of the natural beauty of Long Qing Xia.

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We want a better climate

Rittermann China river economic boom documentary photography travel landscape portraiture people climate society photo artRittermann China river economic boom documentary photography travel landscape portraiture people climate society photo art Rittermann China river economic boom documentary photography travel landscape portraiture people climate society photo art Rittermann China river economic boom documentary photography travel landscape portraiture people climate society photo art Rittermann China river economic boom documentary photography travel landscape portraiture people climate society photo art Rittermann China river economic boom documentary photography travel landscape portraiture people climate society photo art Rittermann China river economic boom documentary photography travel landscape portraiture people climate society photo art

Photograph of a man sitting in a deck chair in-front of a large coal power plant in Jining, Shandong Provinz / documented by Philipp Scholz Rittermann, from his series ‘Emperor’s River’ documenting China’s economic boom and its victims along the its Grand Canal that stretching thousands of miles from Beijing to near Shanghai.

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We make our way back

train station night tracks photography china, train station track lights night photography travel

Beautiful night time photograph of Marshalling Train Station, China / photographed by Zong Qin.

 

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We connect

Galaxy-SOHO-by-Zaha-Hadid-Architects london organic architecture curved composite concrete building china modern computer parametric designGalaxy-SOHO-by-Zaha-Hadid-Architects london organic architecture curved composite concrete building china modern computer parametric design Galaxy-SOHO-by-Zaha-Hadid-Architects london organic architecture curved composite concrete building china modern computer parametric design Galaxy-SOHO-by-Zaha-Hadid-Architects london organic architecture curved composite concrete building china modern computer parametric design Galaxy-SOHO-by-Zaha-Hadid-Architects london organic architecture curved composite concrete building china modern computer parametric design Galaxy-SOHO-by-Zaha-Hadid-Architects london organic architecture curved composite concrete building china modern computer parametric design

Galaxy Soho – a 330,000-square-metre retail, office and entertainment complex in Beijing comprising of four main domed structures, fused together by bridges and platforms between curving floor plates to create a fluid environment that surrounds a series of public courtyards and a larger central “canyon”/ by Zaha Hadid Architects, London, photoggraphed by Iwan Baan

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Communist Heaven

chinese real estate developmen Huaxi Xun thousing architecture communism shares china travel trip village thousand rows of houses look a like

Houses in Huaxi Xun, a devoted communist village 2 hours from Shanghai, China that calls itself the number one village under heaven’. The idea behind the village is that everyone holds shares in its industries, mainly steel and agriculture, and they all live in similar houses that they get for their shares, rather than actually paying for them with money.  The man who hosted us proudly proclaimed that Huaxi Xun has no poor people, and everyone in the village has about $200,000 per year, a huge sum in China. / visit Emily Hartley’s blog to read more.

 

 

 

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We take a stand

house highway china tearing down nail house province old retired couple resisting squatting demolition  house highway china tearing down nail house province old retired couple resisting squatting demolitionhouse highway china tearing down nail house province old retired couple resisting squatting demolition

The house of Luo Baogen and his wife who refused to accept an unfair compensation for relocating and stubbornly remained living in their flat as allowed by law, forcing developers to refrain from tearing down their side of this apartment building Xiazhangyang, a village in Zhejiang province, China and eventually building the planned 4 lane highway around the house itself.  / Photographs courtesy of AFP/Reuters/Getty Images

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White Out

skyline white city fog architecture photography architecture hong kong city dense china population skyscrapers towers fog city . spring - silence series - contemporary landscape photography by Lam Pok Yin  white  architectural

white city fog architecture photography architecture hong kong city dense china population skyscrapers towers fog city . spring - silence series - contemporary landscape photography by Lam Pok Yin  white  architectural white city fog architecture photography architecture hong kong city dense china population skyscrapers towers fog city . spring - silence series - contemporary landscape photography by Lam Pok Yin  white  architectural white city fog architecture photography architecture hong kong city dense china population skyscrapers towers fog city . spring - silence series - contemporary landscape photography by Lam Pok Yin  white  architectural

Causeway Bay – one of the most dense residential areas of Hong Kong – engulfed by fog / photographed by Lam Pok Yin

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We go with the flow

ordos art museum china organic architecture modern contemporary art museum start architect facade curvy panels systems flow curves curvy architectural photography icon sight visit travel

dutch photographer iwan baan has documented the recently completed and opened 'ordos museum' in ordos, china by<br />beijing-based practice MAD architects. situated at the create of a dune-like hill, the building appears to have landed<br />from another world into the recently created urban center within the once gobi desert. the masterplan is mindful of the existing<br />cultural traditions of the area while addressing the progress and future of the city, allowing the community to congregate and lounge<br />within the surrounding plazas. surfaced with metal panels, the undulating exterior protects the interior from the region's harsh winters<br />and sand storms.<br />upon entering the museum, an atrium with characteristics of a cave and canyon become apparent, introducing swaths of daylight<br />from above along with shadowed passages leading towards galleries. a series of bridges traverse the chasm from one void to another<br />guided by the changes in illumination. residents of the area may circulate through the interior to efficiently cross from one side of<br />the site to the other without entering exhibitions. employees of the center are provided a natural work environment with office and research spaces which flank a south-facing internal garden.ordos art museum china organic architecture modern contemporary art museum start architect facade curvy panels systems flow curves curvy architectural photography icon sight visit travel

Ordos Art Museum, China by MAD architects / photographs by Iwan Baan

We need some solitude

hong kong street temple street busy street signs lights night evening dark neon lights urban city dense population architecture travel asia china city growth

Temple Street in Hong Kong / unknown photographer

 

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We brace the storm

black and white vintage street architecture photographer city architecture wind rain girl covering with newspaper protecting from storm
SPONTANEOUS MOMENTS – Chick Dropped in Soup: No, not chicken soup…It’s a literal translation of a Chinese expression for being drenched. Caught this well-dressed lady trying to cross the street in a torrential downpour.
Travel Photos, ready your cameras. The National Geographic is extending their 24th annual Traveler Photo Contest to July 11 giving those passionate picture takers an opportunity to let the world see their amazing photos. There are four categories: Outdoor Scenes, Sense of Place, Travel Portraits and Spontaneous Moments. With last year pulling in almost 13,000 images from all over the world, the contest features the most spectacular realities of the most simplest of moments. A sense of wonderment, personality and emotion transcend from these amazing images highlighting the diverse and remarkable characteristics of the photographer. The following photographs are a small collection of the editor’s picks in each of the categories.

Chick Dropped in Soup: No, not chicken soup…It’s a literal translation of a Chinese expression for being drenched. Photograph of a well-dressed lady trying to cross the street in a torrential downpour. / photograph by Brian Yen – National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

We make things transparent

Based on Orproject’s research into anisotropic sheet morphologies, the geometries have here been used in a structural orthogonal orientation and form a system of columns, arches and vaults, all based on single-curved elements. The resulting field of lines takes the viewer’s eye across the structure and into the sky, and like a giant flower Ban is hovering in the air above Beijing’s ancient Hutong roofs.

Photograph of “Ban” Pavilion designed by Orproject . A construction from bent polymer sheets which form a self-supporting structure and create shapes and volume from a multitude of leaves.

The Great Walk

great wall of china monument stone architecture wonder of the world photography dynasty chinese wall travel trip explore travaller visit wall of china trecking camping holiday destination flickr tumblr photography blog great best blog stunning landscape photography
Hiking the wall
Jiankou section – Great Wall of China

‘Hiking the wall’ / Jiankou section – Great Wall of China, by Philip Walker

Library Living

architecture photography library designn books reading library architecture photo tumblr blog wordpress great libraries beautiful reading room japanese minimalist architecture timber

Liyuan Library by Li Xiaodong Atelier china timber architecture reading books beautiuful architecturall photography blog best wordpress

Liyuan Library by Li Xiadong Atelier near Beijing, China / photographs by Li Xiaodong

We like variety

Yangshuo Shangri-la  Guilin rice fields landscape china mountain river nature earth climate landscape photography beautiful stunning best places in the world top visit destination
A boat trip on the peaceful Li River is the absolute high point of any visit to Guilin. A cruise from Guilin to Yangshuo, visitors will experience the winding and twisting Li River, goes past the many bizarre mountains whose shapes have inspired and fired the Chinese imagination, the Elephant Trunk Mountain, Old Man Mountain, Pagoda Mountain and Hole Mountain. Cormorant fishermen in narrow bamboo boats, bathing children, water buffaloes, small settlement and women doing their washing on the banks of the river can be seen along the way. Yangshuo, at the end of the boat journey is today a developed village that thrives mainly on tourism and seems to have nothing but tourist shops.

Guilin, China / photographed by Avi Abrams

We study

architecture student study photography library design reading books timber photo china architect
Liyuan Library by Li Xiadong Atelier near Beijing, China

Liyuan Library by Li Xiadong Atelier near Beijing, China

We are in a playful mood

Beijing National Aquatics Center, Water Cube, China architecture, photography, art, photo cool fun siwmming pool

Beijing National Aquatics Center, Water Cube, China

‘Water Cube’ Beijing National Aquatic Center / photographs: Hazel Legate / Matthew Niederhauser

…feels like we are living in a library these days

architecture photography library
Liyuan Library by Li Xiadong Atelier near Beijing, China

Liyuan Library by Li Xiadong Atelier near Beijing, China