We are going in circles

Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (3) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (4) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (5) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (6) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (1)

Hostel Wadi in Kasterlee, Belgium by Studio Bernardo Secchi & Paola Viganò. Photos by Frederik Buyckx

We hang out together

Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen (1) Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen (2) Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen (3) Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen (4)

Close Up Lights by Cristina Vezzini and Sheng Tsang Chen

We are back in the house

Hazukashi House, Kyoto by Alts Design Office Hazukashi House, Kyoto by Alts Design Office  (4) Hazukashi House, Kyoto by Alts Design Office  (3) Hazukashi House, Kyoto by Alts Design Office  (2)

Hazukashi House, Kyoto by Alts Design Office

House of Patios

East façade fragment showing living room and bedroom´s courtya House of Patios AR arquitetos (3) Detail of mezzanine from staircase Backyard view pointing northwest Courtyard upward view East façade fragment showing mezzanine´s courtyard, evening vi

‘Casa dos pátios’ in Sao Paulo, Brazil – designed by ar arquitetos / photographed by Leonardo Finotti

We are a mazed

Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (2) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (3) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (4) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (5) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (6) Giant Bjarke Ingels Group Maze Opens The 60-foot maze opens today at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C (1)

A giant 60-foot maze at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C created by Danish architects BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group

Factory Living

Bofill_266-12 001 Bofill_266-02 001 The Factory, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by Ricardo Bofill (4) The Factory, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by Ricardo Bofill (5) The Factory, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by Ricardo Bofill (6) The Factory, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by Ricardo Bofill (1)

The amazing ‘Factory’, Sant Just Desvern, Spain by architect Ricardo Bofill.

In 1973 Ricardo Bofill found a disused cement factory, an industrial complex from the turn of the century consisting of over 30 silos, subterranean galleries and huge machine rooms, and he decided to transform it into the head office of Taller de Arquitectura. Remodelling work lasted two years. The factory, abandoned and partially in ruins, was a compendium of surrealist elements: stairs that climbed up to nowhere, mighty reinforced concrete structures that sustained nothing, pieces of iron hanging in the air, huge empty spaces filled nonetheless with magic.

We feel squeezed

Soft Light by Simon Frambach (2) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (3) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (4) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (5) Soft Light by Simon Frambach (1)

Soft Light by Simon Frambach /

You lay down in bed to read for a few minutes. You need both a night light for reading and a pillow to life your head. In the creative mind of Simon Frambach, that combination is one. Simon created a inventive new way to create light and rest by combing polyurethane foam and a lightbulb with a protective cage. The soft white polyurethane foam turns the harsh bright light into a warm glow that you can stuff anywhere. You can tuck the light under  your head and use if as a pillow. Jam the light in a small spot where it stays nestled in place providing you with a little extra light for reading or play. (via induldg.com)

We drink coffee

Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (2)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (3)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (4)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (5)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (6)Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee (1)

Dutch lab‘s ‘Gothicism’ is an aesthetically intricate device that uses the cold drip method to produce cups of coffee

We stick together

Maple saplings, 70' highstickwork sculptures by patrick dougherty (5)stickwork sculptures by patrick dougherty (2)stickwork sculptures by patrick dougherty (4)stickwork sculptures by patrick dougherty

Fantastic ‘Stickwork’ sculptures by American artist Patrick Dougherty

We are going in circles

Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (2)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (3)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (4)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (5)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (6)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza (7)Museo de la Memoria de Andalucía Granada Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza

The Ma: Andalucia’s Museum of Memory, in Avenida de las Ciencias, Granada, Spain designed by Alberto Campo Baeza Architects. / photographed by Javier Callejas

We dont have time

By The Hour by Jess FüglerBy the Hour is a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers but instead looks to use an alternating surface (2)By The Hour by Jess FüglerBy the Hour is a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers but instead looks to use an alternating surface (3)By The Hour by Jess FüglerBy the Hour is a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers but instead looks to use an alternating surface (4)By The Hour by Jess FüglerBy the Hour is a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers but instead looks to use an alternating surface (1)

‘By the Hour’ –  a concept prototype that looks to tell time without using numbers
but instead looks to use an alternating surface, designed by Jess Fügler

Broken Home

Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (2)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (3)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (4)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (1)Installations of broken miniature paper houses by Daniele Del Nero (5)

Installation of miniature houses by Savona and Milan based artist Daniele Del Nero from the “Brockenhaus” series. Using black paper, Del Nero constructs architectural scale models of deserted towns. To create the effect of neglect and abandonment, the artist covers the black paper with construction paste and flour.

In his artist statement, Del Nero writes, “My purpose is to talk about the sense of time and destiny of the planet after the human species, through the sense of restlessness which abandoned buildings are able to communicate.”

We find space

 

House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (5)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (3)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (2)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (4)House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office (1)

House in Fukawa, Japan by ‘Suppose Design Office’

We like geometry

 

Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (2)Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (3)Miss Maple by Elisa Strozyk Photographed by Sebastian Neeb (1)

‘Miss Maple’ designed by Elisa Strozyk and photographed by Sebastian Neeb /// Text from the designer’s website:

MISS MAPLE

pendant lamp, 85 x 85 x 35 cm
material: wooden textile, steel

The pendant lamp “Miss Maple” is showing the use of a familiar material in an unconventional way. We usually experience wood as a plain surface, but here it is broken down into a grid of triangles. This makes a flexible lampshade which can be transformed manually in three-dimensional ways.
While the lamp generates warm light at night the surface outside becomes more evident with daylight and turns the lamp into sculptural object.

We multi-task

Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (2) Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (3) Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova (1)

Oxymoron Desk by Anna Lotova.

Russian designer Anna Lotova slotted two layers of foam beneath the surface of this wooden desk to create squishy spaces for storing stationery and other objects.

Named Oxymoron Desk, the piece combines two contrasting materials for its tabletop;  two thick layers of upholstered foam are sandwiched between a pair of plywood sheets with curved edges.

A sliced opening along the top plywood sheet exposes the soft layer underneath, creating a place where documents and stationery can be inserted.

“As an architect and designer I know how important it is to have a comfortable and enjoyable work table,” said Lotova. “Oxymoron Desk is a result of interaction between two contradictory materials that enhance each other and gain a new meaning.”

A side table can also be added by slipping an extra piece of plywood between the two cushioned layers on either side of the desk.

An accompanying lamp can also be inserted between the layers, or can be slotted into the top and positioned at different angles. (Text via dezeen.com)

We want a cabin

Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan via Archdaily (2) Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan via Archdaily (3) Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan - Sou Fujimoto Architects Photos by Iwan Baan

Final Wooden House in Kumamoto, Japan by Sou Fujimoto Architects / Photographed by Iwan Baan

 

Words from the architect: I thought of making an ultimate wooden architecture. It was conceived by just mindlessly stacking 350mm square.

Lumber is extremely versatile. In an ordinary wooden architecture, lumber is effectively differentiated according to functions in various localities precisely because it is so versatile. Columns, beams, foundations, exterior walls, interior walls, ceilings, floorings, insulations, furnishings, stairs, window frames, meaning all. However, I thought if lumber is indeed so versatile then why not create architecture by one rule that fulfills all of these functions. I envisioned the creation of new spatiality that preserves primitive conditions of a harmonious entity before various functions and roles differentiated.

There are no separations of floor, wall, and ceiling here. A place that one thought was a floor becomes a chair, a ceiling, a wall from various positions. The floor levels are relative and spatiality is perceived differently according to one’s position. Here, people are distributed three-dimensionally in the space. This is a place like an amorphous landscape with a new experience of various senses of distances. Inhabitants discover, rather than being prescribed, various functionalities in these convolutions.

This bungalow no longer fits the category of wooden architecture. If wooden architecture is merely something made from wood, then wood itself surpasses the architectural procedures to directly become a “place where people live” in this bungalow. It is of an existence akin to primitive conditions before architecture. Rather than just a new architecture, this is a new origin, a new existence.

We are one in a million

One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (2) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (3) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (4) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (5) One million stars  by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos (1)

‘One million stars’  – art installation by ​Maryann Talia Paul. Photos by John Englezos.

In short, The Million Stars project is an international weaving art project sparked by a personal repsonse to a local tragedy…” read more here

We make moves

Got Chess (2015) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2016) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2017) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2018) by Peter Baeten Got Chess (2014) by Peter Baeten

Flat design meets Moleskine notebooks meets… chess.

Inspired by classic leather notebooks, this pared-back chess set is gorgeous in its simplicity and execution. Belgian designer Peter Baeten has channelled his love of classic leather notebooks into this beautiful minimal chess set.

“By working with the silhouettes of the pieces, it walks the line between 2D and 3D. Because of this, only the ones who are playing have a complete overview of the pieces on the board. Bystanders will have to do with seeing lines move around on the board,” Baeten explains.

“The set is lasercut and hand varnished, so the natural wood grains remain visible. It contains 4 tablets and a leather cover which also serves as a pad to play on. There are no screws, hinges, glue, or any other type of materials used, therefore there is no assembly necessary, and each single piece can easily be replaced.”

(text via creativeblog.com)

We need cover

Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (4) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (6) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (2) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (3) Eduardo Torroja. Zarzuela racetrack stands.Photos by Ximo Michavila (5)

Beautiful photographs of the very elegant racetrack stands of the Zarzuela Hippodrome (1935) in Madrid, Spain, by architects Carlos Arniches and Martín Dominguez, and engineer Eduardo Torroja / photographed by Ximo Michavila.

We had an important day

The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (2) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (3) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (4) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (5) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (6) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (7) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (8) The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen (1)

The Mini Book of Life’s Major Events by artist Evan Lorenzen

Herringbone

Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan12 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan11 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan10 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan9 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan8 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan7 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan6 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan5 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan4 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan3 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan2 Herringbone-House-by-Atelier-ChanChan1

The beautiful ‘Herringbone House’ by London based Atelier ChanChan in Islington, London. Photographs by Mike Tsang.

Words from the architect:

The house aims to relate to its context by taking the syntax of the local vernacular: namely gable ended roofs and the brick material of the Victorian terraces. However, the open plan interiors with ceiling to floor windows, skylights and courtyards are supported by a modern steel structure.

The combination making for a modern vernacular house inspired by the old to create something new. The ornamental herringbone brickwork was used to create personal expression and to articulate the picture windows and volumes by using framing, pattern and variety in the laying of the bricks.

Tree House

Tree House by 6a architects (7) Tree House by 6a architects (6) Tree House by 6a architects (5) Tree House by 6a architects (4) Tree House by 6a architects (3) Tree House by 6a architects (2) Tree House by 6a architects

‘Tree House’ by London based architecture studio 6a Architects // Photography by Johan Dehlin.

London studio 6a Architects has extended the home of architecture critic Rowan Moore and his family by adding a timber structure that curves around a tree (+ slideshow). The extension was designed by 6a Architects to provide a new ground-floor bedroom and bathroom for the London house, which is an amalgamation of two cottages constructed in the 1830s. A ramped corridor runs parallel to the existing house, negotiating a gentle change in level and allowing access for the mother of the family, who uses a wheelchair. This corridor connects the house’s living room with the new bedroom suite, which extends out into the garden. The exterior of the structure is clad with reclaimed timber, while white-painted timber panels line the interior walls. Glazed doors open the space out to a curving timber deck that surrounds the sumac tree and steps down to the garden. (Text via dezeen)

Flower Power

Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (2) Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (3) Table for a Flower by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem (1)

‘Table for a Flower’ by Adam and Sam Cigler of Studio Vjem

Slippery Slope

Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters. Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters.

House K by world renowned Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto / photographs by Iwan Baan, text by designboom:

Sou fujimoto‘s ‘house k’ is a voluminous, crescent-shaped home in northeastern osaka’s dense urban fabric. the approach to an disproportionate L shaped site is one of a soaring, thickened ground plane. pressed against the neighbors’ homes on three sides and bordered by a grove of trees, the rectangular volume literally grows out of the ground with a gentle concave motion until it peaks at the eastern-most point. the canopy therefore becomes a striking visual object from the exterior while providing the family with much-needed exterior space in the form of a rooftop terrace. the habitable roof additionally confronts the ubiquitous concrete slabs with a composition of trees in faceted metal planters.

360

360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-17 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-18 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-16 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-15 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-11 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-12 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-10 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-9 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-8 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-5 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-4 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-2 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-1 360-story-book-cutouts-by-yusuke-oono-3360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (2) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (3) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (4) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (5) 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono (1)

Amazing 360 degree storybooks by Japanese artist and architect Yusuke Oono who has designed a fantastic series of 40-page books that fan out into 360-degree carousels, each page laser-cut and bound from Yusuke’s digital design.

We grow

Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra

Fantastic minimalist hydroponic terrariums from Japan, designed by 10¹² Terra

Mum’s Place

Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)  Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF) Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)Corrugated aluminum 'house for mother' in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)

A wonderful example of beautiful simplicity – a corrugated aluminum ‘house for mother’ in Sweden, designed by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)

‘House for mother’ by förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF), is located in linköping, sweden, and is part of the linköpingsbo 2017 housing exhibition. the dwelling is divided into two parallel volumes slightly shifted from each other, thus creating spaces both in front of and behind the building. oriented to a park in the north, and an alley in the south, the two adjacent gables emphasize the overall theme for the area in general: narrow plots and a variation of housing types. the first form contains the kitchen, dining room and living room, with the bathroom and laundry room housed in a smaller cabin within the structure. the second volume, partly in two levels with a less inclined roof, accommodates  the bedrooms and a small studio. the façades and roof are covered with raw, corrugated aluminum in juxtaposition to the warm interior with an exposed timber structure and walls lined with plywood. the polished concrete flooring folds up along the perimeter of the building and transforms into a bench and shelf. (Text via designboom.com / all images courtesy of förstberg arkitektur och formgivning (FAF)

We miss Berlin

The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of BerlinThe 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin The 'Atriumhaus' - a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin

The ‘Atriumhaus’ – a beautifully designed atrium house in Händelallee, Hansaviertel, Berlin by award-winning architecture studio bfs d of Berlin

With a sure hand bfs architects have helped an atrium house in Berlin’s famous Hansaviertel back to its former glamour. The modernist building was part of the 1957 building exhibition in Berlin’s Tiergarten park. It was designed by Eduard Ludwig, who among other things also designed the airlift monument at Tempelhof airport.

Photographs by Annette Kisling | Text by: Mirko Beetschen

We have a sense of humour

artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (1) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (8) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (7) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (6)artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (2) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (3)artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (5) artist, Ole Ukena, creates diverse media works with an intriguing sense of humor (4)

Humorous artworks using a variety of different media by artist Ole Ukena.

We orbit

'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. Tomas Saraceno - In Orbit (2013 (4) Tomas Saraceno - In Orbit (2013 (5) 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication.

‘In Orbit’ ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.

Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.

Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:

This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication.

Text Via colossal / All photographs © Studio Saraceno & Kunstsammlung NRW

We spin

United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (1) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (2) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (3) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (4) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (5) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (6) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (7) United Visual Artists  Momentum at The Curve, Barbican Center (8)

From the exhibition: “Momentum’ by United Visual Artists currently on display at The Curve, Barbican Center, London /

Words from the Barbican website:

Our internal model of time, movement, mass and space is based on a lifetime of experience, perhaps even genetically encoded. What happens when we build a new model? What happens when we bend the rules?’ UVA

United Visual Artists invites you to experience Momentum, a carefully choreographed sequence of light, sound and movement, which responds to the unique space of the Curve.

Momentum consists of twelve pendulums that activate light and sound as they swing, drawing attention to the Curve’s vast arc, inviting you to journey through the space guided by your heightened senses. Each pendulum has been meticulously designed and built using steel, aluminium, and custom electronics. The sound is individual to each pendulum, prepared and tuned to seamlessly resonate as they move within the Curve.

Momentum creates an environment that has its foundations in detailed research, sophisticated computer technology and mechanical expertise. Yet, the effect is to create a space that feels wondrously transformed, one which you are invited to experience and explore.

We are surrounded

a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (1) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (2) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (3) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (4) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (5) a-art house by kazuyo sejima for the inujima art house project (6)

‘A-art house’ by designed by Japanese architect Kazuyo Sejima (of the Japanese studio SANAA) in collaboration with Yuko Hasegawa (chief curator of Tokyo’s Museum of Contemporary Art) for the Inujima art house project inI nujima, Japan / Photographed by Iwan Baan

We are going in circles

Tiger and Turtle by Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth - photos by Manuela Martin (3) Tiger and Turtle by Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth - photos by Manuela Martin (2) Tiger and Turtle by Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth - photos by Manuela Martin (4) Tiger and Turtle by Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth - photos by Manuela Martin (5) Tiger and Turtle by Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth - photos by Manuela Martin (1)

Tiger & Turtle – Magic Mountain – a walkable, large outdoor sculpture on the Heinrich Hildebrand Höhe in Duisburg Wanheim, Germany – designed by Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth / photographed by Manuela Martin

We work from home

The Workbed by Ines Kaag and Desiree Heiss, of BLESS (2) The Workbed by Mira Schröder, exhibition designer for experimental design group BLESS. Mira created a unique furniture piece – a piece of furniture that flips from spacious desk into an instant bed. The Workbed’s mattress is unveiled by a rotating mechanism. Sheets are specially designed to latch to the underside of the table when it is turned upside down. It’s a perfect solution for small, urban living, it’s also ideal for offering nap options in a work setting. Work and then if you need – just take a nap after transforming the desk into the bed – it’s easy and comfortable! The Workbed by Ines Kaag and Desiree Heiss, of BLESS (3) The Workbed by Ines Kaag and Desiree Heiss, of BLESS (4) The Workbed by Ines Kaag and Desiree Heiss, of BLESS (1)

The Workbed by Mira Schröder, exhibition designer for experimental design group BLESS. Mira created a unique furniture piece – a piece of furniture that flips from spacious desk into an instant bed. The Workbed’s mattress is unveiled by a rotating mechanism. Sheets are specially designed to latch to the underside of the table when it is turned upside down. It’s a perfect solution for small, urban living, it’s also ideal for offering nap options in a work setting. Work and then if you need – just take a nap after transforming the desk into the bed – it’s easy and comfortable! (text via digsdigs.com)

We crawl

Mechanical arthropods and insects made from watch parts and light bulbs by Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-Gates Mechanical arthropods and insects made from watch parts and light bulbs by Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-Gates Mechanical arthropods and insects made from watch parts and light bulbs by Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-GatesMechanical arthropods and insects made from watch parts and light bulbs by Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-Gates aMechanical arthropods and insects made from watch parts and light bulbs by Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-Gates Mechanical arthropods and insects made from watch parts and light bulbs by Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-Gates

Mechanical arthropods and insects made from watch parts and light bulbs by Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-Gates

This post is part of our second Theme Week where since last Friday, you the public had the chance to choose between 5 themes/inspirations for each post this week. Yet again you chose probably the most challenging theme we had listed: ‘Miniature’ Hope you enjoy… :)

Home is Where the Heart is

Home is where the heart is (1)Home is where the heart is (8)Home is where the heart is (7)Home is where the heart is (6)Home is where the heart is (5)Home is where the heart is (2) Beautiful sculpture work by Elle Nitters, from Rotterdam, Netherlands. Her words:      I was asked by designer Koen de Wilde to participate in his project "huisnr." (engl: House Number). He is fascinated by the basic shape of a house and hands out little wooden houses to designers and artists so they can do their own thing with it.Home is where the heart is (4)

This post is part of our second Theme Week where since last Friday, you the public had the chance to choose between 5 themes/inspirations for each post this week. Yet again you chose probably the most challenging theme we had listed: ‘Miniature’ Hope you enjoy… :)

Beautiful sculpture work by Elle Nitters, from Rotterdam, Netherlands. Her words:

I was asked by designer Koen de Wilde to participate in his project “huisnr.” (engl: House Number). He is fascinated by the basic shape of a house and hands out little wooden houses to designers and artists so they can do their own thing with it.
 
This is my contribution to the project. You can also see it on the project website: http://huisnr.koenst.nl/005

We melt

Melting Ceramics by Livia Marin (2) Melting Ceramics by Livia Marin (3) Melting Ceramics by Livia Marin (4) Melting Ceramics by Livia Marin (5) Melting Ceramics by Livia Marin (6) Melting Ceramics by Livia Marin (1)

Melting Ceramics – In her series ‘Nomad Patterns’ artist Livia Marin presents us with a set of intriguing sculptures of ceramic bowls, cups and tea pots that each melt into a surface whilst at the same time maintaining their original pattern. The sculptures were on display at the Eagle Gallery in London in 2012.

The Lantern

THE LANTERN, NORWEGIAN WOOD. AWP Office for terrotorial reconfiguration & Atelier Oslo. Sandes_Norway. images (c) AWP (2) THE LANTERN, NORWEGIAN WOOD. AWP Office for terrotorial reconfiguration & Atelier Oslo. Sandes_Norway. images (c) AWP (3) THE LANTERN, NORWEGIAN WOOD. AWP Office for terrotorial reconfiguration & Atelier Oslo. Sandes_Norway. images (c) AWP (4) THE LANTERN, NORWEGIAN WOOD. AWP Office for terrotorial reconfiguration & Atelier Oslo. Sandes_Norway. images (c) AWP (5) THE LANTERN, NORWEGIAN WOOD. AWP Office for terrotorial reconfiguration & Atelier Oslo. Sandes_Norway. images (c) AWP (1)

The ‘Lantern Pavilion’ in Langgata, Sandnes,   by AWP / Atelier Oslo architects. Photographs by Jonas Adolfsen

We have company

Katharina Fritsch Tischgesellschaft (Company at the Table), 1998 (2) Katharina Fritsch Tischgesellschaft (Company at the Table), 1998 (4) Katharina Fritsch Tischgesellschaft (Company at the Table), 1998 (3) Katharina Fritsch Tischgesellschaft (Company at the Table), 1998 (5) Katharina Fritsch Tischgesellschaft (Company at the Table), 1998 (1)

‘Tischgesellschaft’ / Company at the Table – 1998 art installation by Katharina Fritsch.

We fly

Ships That Sail Through the Clouds Meet Luigi Prina, the 83-Year-Old Builder of Flying Model Ships. Photos by Gianluca Giannone courtesy Blinking City (2) Ships That Sail Through the Clouds Meet Luigi Prina, the 83-Year-Old Builder of Flying Model Ships. Photos by Gianluca Giannone courtesy Blinking City (3) Ships That Sail Through the Clouds Meet Luigi Prina, the 83-Year-Old Builder of Flying Model Ships. Photos by Gianluca Giannone courtesy Blinking City (4) Ships That Sail Through the Clouds Meet Luigi Prina, the 83-Year-Old Builder of Flying Model Ships. Photos by Gianluca Giannone courtesy Blinking City (5) Ships That Sail Through the Clouds Meet Luigi Prina, the 83-Year-Old Builder of Flying Model Ships. Photos by Gianluca Giannone courtesy Blinking City (6) Ships That Sail Through the Clouds Meet Luigi Prina, the 83-Year-Old Builder of Flying Model Ships. Photos by Gianluca Giannone courtesy Blinking City (1)

‘The Ships That Sail Through the Clouds’ by Luigi Prina, 83-year-old builder of flying model ships.

Luigi Prina, 83 years old, has been an architect for more than 50 years. He has been interested in aircraft modelling since a very young age. The flying ships are made from ultrathin paper and balsa wood. Everything is optimized for flight: from the weight (between 20 and 50 grams) to the aerodynamic shape. They fly like any propeller airplane. The only difference is that here the propeller is powered by an internal elastic band and not an engine. (Text by Blinking City, photographs by Gianluca Giannone)

We look up

From the series 'Vaults' by photographer David Stephenson in which he beautifully captures cathedral and church ceilings across Europe. From the series 'Vaults' by photographer David Stephenson in which he beautifully captures cathedral and church ceilings across Europe. From the series 'Vaults' by photographer David Stephenson in which he beautifully captures cathedral and church ceilings across Europe. From the series 'Vaults' by photographer David Stephenson in which he beautifully captures cathedral and church ceilings across Europe. From the series 'Vaults' by photographer David Stephenson in which he beautifully captures cathedral and church ceilings across Europe. From the series 'Vaults' by photographer David Stephenson in which he beautifully captures cathedral and church ceilings across Europe. From the series 'Vaults' by photographer David Stephenson in which he beautifully captures cathedral and church ceilings across Europe.

From the series ‘Vaults’ by photographer David Stephenson in which he beautifully captures cathedral and church ceilings across Europe transforming them into fascinating two dimensional patterns.

We are back in our little house

'Layers and Reflections' by Autumn de Wilde (2) 'Layers and Reflections' by Autumn de Wilde (3) 'Layers and Reflections' by Autumn de Wilde (4) 'Layers and Reflections' by Autumn de Wilde (1)

Beautiful, playful and quirky mirror houses designed by photographer and creative director Autumn De Wilde as part of the Mirror House Cadillac 2015 ad campaign.

 

/// This is the last past in our first Theme Week, where since last Friday, you the public had the chance to choose between 5 theme/inspirations for each post this week –  you chose ‘Reflection.’

We hope you enjoyed it! :) Happy Weekend Everyone

We are apart

Architecture + Photography + Design  Diego Guevara (2) Architecture + Photography + Design  Diego Guevara (3) Architecture + Photography + Design  Diego Guevara (4) Architecture + Photography + Design  Diego Guevara (5) Architecture + Photography + Design  Diego Guevara (6) Architecture + Photography + Design  Diego Guevara (7) Architecture + Photography + Design  Diego Guevara (1)

Beautiful, abstract architectural photography of buildings & facades in Miami, Florida – captured by Diego Guevara

/// This post is part of our first Theme Week where since last Friday, you the public had the chance to choose between 5 theme/inspirations for each post this week. You chose ‘Reflection.’ :)

Light Container

Light Container (2014) by Martín Azúa Light Container (2015) by Martín Azúa Light Container (2016) by Martín Azúa Light Container (2013) by Martín Azúa

Suspended inside a floating metallic basket, the ‘light container’ by spanish designer Martin Azua treats rays of illumination as something with weight and volume. dipping accordingly to the side, the immaterial nature of light is captured within the sculptural frame. constructed in a series of three different sizes, the shades can be hung individually or in groups. the inner glass diffuser generates a warm, dim light that produces soft shadows – suitable for a range of different spaces. (text via designboom) Images courtesy of Martin Azua

We have goose bumps

Selfridges Building by Future Systems. Photos by Giles McGarry (2) Selfridges Building by Future Systems. Photos by Giles McGarry (3) Selfridges Building by Future Systems. Photos by Giles McGarry (4) Selfridges Building by Future Systems. Photos by Giles McGarry (1)

Fantastic Black and white photographs of the Selfridges Building in Birmingham, UK designed by architecture studio Future Systems, photographed by Giles McGarry

We punch holes

Ant House in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura Ant House in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura Ant House in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura Ant House in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura Ant House in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura Ant House in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura Ant House in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura Ant House in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura

‘Ant House’ in Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan by mA-style architects /  photographed by Kai Nakamura

Mind the Gap

dezeen_Keret-House-by-Jakub-Szczesny_ss_1  keret house (2) keret house (1) keret house jakub szczesny (3) keret house jakub szczesny (4) keret house jakub szczesny (2) keret house jakub szczesny (1)keret house (3)

‘Keret House’ – the world’s narrowest house, in Warsaw, Poland designed by Polish architect Jakub Szczesny of , Built between two existing structures from two historical epochs, the narrow infill is more of an art installation that reacts to the past and present of Warsaw. Although the semi-transparent, windowless structure’s widest point measures only 122 centimeters, it’s naturally lit interior doesn’t seem nearly as claustrophobic as one would think.

The Keret House will serve indefinitely as a temporary home for traveling writers, starting with Israeli writer Etgar Keret.

Photographs © Polish Modern Art Foundation / Bartek Warzecha

We are hungry

raisin-1 cacahuettes-1 Piment-rouge-2 Mont-Ventoux-2 lolita2 Bento-2 Avocat-1 Avocat-2 Photographers Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida have created a series of humorous dioramas that depict miniature people going about their daily lives in an edible world. Titled MINIMIAM, a play on words that marries miniature and “yummy” (miam in French), the project has been ongoing since 2002 and was inspired by the married couple’s profession as commercial food photographers. “We’re both food photographer in our daily work, and we’re both quite crazy about cooking, eating and everything about food,” says Ida. “So when we started this small people series, naturally we created the stories related to the food.” (found on thisiscolossal) Photographers Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida have created a series of humorous dioramas that depict miniature people going about their daily lives in an edible world. Titled MINIMIAM, a play on words that marries miniature and “yummy” (miam in French), the project has been ongoing since 2002 and was inspired by the married couple’s profession as commercial food photographers. “We’re both food photographer in our daily work, and we’re both quite crazy about cooking, eating and everything about food,” says Ida. “So when we started this small people series, naturally we created the stories related to the food.” (found on thisiscolossal)

Photographers Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida have created a series of humorous dioramas that depict miniature people going about their daily lives in an edible world. Titled MINIMIAM, a play on words that marries miniature and “yummy” (miam in French), the project has been ongoing since 2002 and was inspired by the married couple’s profession as commercial food photographers. “We’re both food photographer in our daily work, and we’re both quite crazy about cooking, eating and everything about food,” says Ida. “So when we started this small people series, naturally we created the stories related to the food.” (found on & text by thisiscolossal)

New Beginning – Happy Pinning

2014 we are going to continue to divide our time between our Hovercraftdoggy Blog and our pinterest page, where we are focusing more on architecture and design such as beautiful interior spaces, furniture and graphic design as well as food & fashion and many more. So don't miss out on all of these and come join us over at Pinterest :)

2014 we are going to continue to divide our time between our Hovercraftdoggy Blog and our pinterest page, where we are focusing more on architecture and design such as beautiful interior spaces, furniture and graphic design as well as food & fashion and many more. So don’t miss out on all of these and come join us over at Pinterest :)

Have a good start to the new year. H

We move

The Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, Chengdu, China designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN ZhonghaiThe Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, Chengdu, China designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN Zhonghai The Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, Chengdu, China designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN Zhonghai The Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, Chengdu, China designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN Zhonghai

The Lanxi Curtilage, International Intangible Cultural Heritage Park, , designed by Archi Union Architects Inc and photographed by SHEN Zhonghai

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