We got lost

The magical Wistman’s Wood in England’s Dartmoor National Park….many photographers and instagrammers never make it out again ;)

Advertisements

We are going in circles

Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (3) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (4) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (5) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (6) Studio Associato Bernardo Secchi Paola Viganò. Hostel Wadi. De Hoge Rielen, Kasterlee. Belgium. photos Frederik Buyckx (1)

Hostel Wadi in Kasterlee, Belgium by Studio Bernardo Secchi & Paola Viganò. Photos by Frederik Buyckx

We could use a cabin

A Canadian treehouse (1) A Canadian treehouse (2) A Canadian treehouse (3) A Canadian treehouse (4)Lake-Cottage-By-UUfie_dezeen_3

Lake-Cottage-By-UUfie_dezeen_9

A Lake Cottage in Bolsover, Ontario, Canada by UUfie / photographed by Naho Kubota.

Words from the architects:

Lake Cottage is a reinterpretation of living in a tree house where nature is an integral part of the building. In a forest of birch and spruce trees along the Kawartha Lakes, the cottage is designed as a two storey, multi-uses space for a large family. The structure, composed of a 7m high A-frame pitch roof covered in black steel and charred cedar siding. A deep cut in the building volume creates a cantilever overhang for a protected outdoor terrace with mirrors to further give the illusion of the building containing the forest inside.

Fourteen openings in the main living space reveal both inhabited spaces, skies and trees. The abstract nature of the interior spaces allows the imagination to flow, and those spaces that could be identified as a domestic interior can suddenly become play spaces. A solid timber staircase leads to a loft which gives the feeling of ascending into tree canopies as sunlight softy falls on a wall covered in shingles stained in light blue.

Using local materials and traditional construction methods, the cottage incorporated sustainable principles. The black wood cladding of the exterior is a technique of charring cedar that acts as a natural agent against termite and fire. Thick walls and roof provide high insulation value, a central wood hearth provides heat, deep recessed windows and operable skylights provide ventilation and diffused natural light.

We are back in the jungle

Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (2)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (3)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (4)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (5)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (6)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (7)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (8)Wandering in the Woods, Oer-Wout (1)

Wandering in the Woods, photography art by ‘Oer-Wout

We are on the road again

forest road landscape nature yosemite national park california forest landscape road highway trip hiking nature wilderness photography

‘Road to Yosemite’ National Park, California / photographed by Giovanbattista Brancato

 

.

See Through

timber architecture L’Observatoire forest pavilion boxes stacked designed by clp architecture archi 20 festival france timber architecturetimber architecture L’Observatoire forest boxes stacked designed by clp architecture archi 20 festival france timber architecture timber architecture L’Observatoire forest boxes stacked designed by clp architecture archi 20 festival france timber architecture

‘L’Observatoire’  a small timber lookout tower blending into the forest, design by CLP Architects for the Archi<20 festival of architecture in the Alsace region of France. / read more

.

We are dreaming

Aurora Borealis in Swedish Lapland, popular, physical phenomenon, arctic poles, snow, aurora, light particles, electrons, atmosphere, north pole, Sweden, Norway, Scandinavia, colourful

Photograph of a beautiful curved band of aurora over the snowy Swedish Lapland. The phenomenon of  Northern Lights (also called Aurora Borealis) occurs when large numbers of electrons stream in towards the Earth along its magnetic field and collide with air particles. The air then lights up rather like what happens in a fluorescent light tube. The resulting colors of the Northern Lights reflect the gases that we find up there. The charged particles originate from the sun, and the weather conditions on the sun decide whether or not we will see the aurora. Photography by  Antony Spencer