Panoramic View

An old residential building is seen surrounded by a newly-built ring viaduct, in Guangzhou

An old residential building is seen surrounded by a newly-built ring viaduct, in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China, June 18, 2015. The building was planned to be demolished, but several units in the building refused to move out as they couldn’t reach a compensation agreement with the authority, local media reported. Picture via REUTERS/Ma Qiang/Southern Metropolis Daily

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We are tempted

© Jens Kristian Balle 2012, www.jenskristianballe.com Temptations Vancouver native Jens Kristian Balle explores peoples desire to do something, especially something wrong in the series “temptations” (3) © Jens Kristian Balle 2012, www.jenskristianballe.com © Jens Kristian Balle 2012, www.jenskristianballe.com © Jens Kristian Balle 2012, www.jenskristianballe.com

Temptations –  by photographer Jens Kristian Balle

temptation – a desire to do something, esp. something wrong or unwise.

Keeping this definition in mind the conceptual Temptations series was created fixating on the negative lifestyle habits and addictions of humans around the world. Though the theme is dark the series is kept light-hearted, full of bright colours and carefully styled objects to match.
The series itself was made to make people smile, but of course, it also has a message to maybe get a few people to think twice about their lifestyle choices, or in a funny way to reinforce what people probably already know. (text via dodho.com)

We miss our favourites

California-based photographer Karen Abad dressed up her friend’s adorable baby as popular TV show characters (5) California-based photographer Karen Abad dressed up her friend’s adorable baby as popular TV show characters (2) California-based photographer Karen Abad dressed up her friend’s adorable baby as popular TV show characters (3) California-based photographer Karen Abad dressed up her friend’s adorable baby as popular TV show characters (4) California-based photographer Karen Abad dressed up her friend’s adorable baby as popular TV show characters

California-based photographer Karen Abad dressed up her friend’s adorable baby as popular TV show characters.

We orbit

'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. Tomas Saraceno - In Orbit (2013 (4) Tomas Saraceno - In Orbit (2013 (5) 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication. 'In Orbit' ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.  Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.  Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:      This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication.

‘In Orbit’ ´wonderful suspended installation by Tomás Saraceno at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Duesseldorf, Germany.

Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.

Known for breaking the boundaries between art and science, Saraceno often refers to his interactive pieces as living organisms. In fact, over a period of three years Saraceno consulted with arachnologists (experts in the study of spiders), as well as architects and engineers to achieve the final design for In Orbit. Via the museum:

This floating spatial configuration becomes an oscillating network of relationships, resonances, and synchronous communication. When several people enter the audacious construction simultaneously, their presence sets it into motion, altering the tension of the steel wires and the intervals between the three meshwork levels. Visitors can coordinate their activities within the space, and are able – not unlike spiders in a web – to perceive space through the medium of vibration. Saraceno himself speaks of a new hybrid form of communication.

Text Via colossal / All photographs © Studio Saraceno & Kunstsammlung NRW

We change mood

Series of interesting portraits named 'Photogenic Princess', where the artists' daughter, Kanna, is featured, by Japanese photographer Nagano Toyokazu Series of interesting portraits named 'Photogenic Princess', where the artists' daughter, Kanna, is featured, by Japanese photographer Nagano Toyokazu Series of interesting portraits named 'Photogenic Princess', where the artists' daughter, Kanna, is featured, by Japanese photographer Nagano Toyokazu Series of interesting portraits named 'Photogenic Princess', where the artists' daughter, Kanna, is featured, by Japanese photographer Nagano Toyokazu Series of interesting portraits named 'Photogenic Princess', where the artists' daughter, Kanna, is featured, by Japanese photographer Nagano Toyokazu Series of interesting portraits named 'Photogenic Princess', where the artists' daughter, Kanna, is featured, by Japanese photographer Nagano Toyokazu Series of interesting portraits named 'Photogenic Princess', where the artists' daughter, Kanna, is featured, by Japanese photographer Nagano Toyokazu

Series of interesting portraits named ‘Photogenic Princess’, where the artists’ daughter, Kanna, is featured, by Japanese photographer Nagano Toyokazu

 

Layerscapes

Series of photos from the collection Layerscapes, by artist Michel Lamoller  ///  Michel explains his work by saying, “I work with many layers of photographs create a new space. This space, still containing photographic information, gets photographed again. In my work I play with the reality of the image, and also with its space by turning the space-illusion into real space again.”(via artistaday)

Series of photos from the collection Layerscapes, by artist Michel Lamoller  ///  Michel explains his work by saying, “I work with many layers of photographs create a new space. This space, still containing photographic information, gets photographed again. In my work I play with the reality of the image, and also with its space by turning the space-illusion into real space again.”(via artistaday)

Series of photos from the collection Layerscapes, by artist Michel Lamoller  ///  Michel explains his work by saying, “I work with many layers of photographs create a new space. This space, still containing photographic information, gets photographed again. In my work I play with the reality of the image, and also with its space by turning the space-illusion into real space again.”(via artistaday)

Series of photos from the collection Layerscapes, by artist Michel Lamoller

///

Michel explains his work by saying, “I work with many layers of photographs create a new space. This space, still containing photographic information, gets photographed again. In my work I play with the reality of the image, and also with its space by turning the space-illusion into real space again.”(via artistaday)

Extraterrestrial delight

Series of photos, showing the amazing planetary cakes, creations of the self-taught chef Rhiannon at Cakecrumbs. The structural layers of the cake for Jupiter are represented by the mudcake in the core (rock/ice), followed by the layer of almond butter (liquid metallic hydrogen) and finally coloured vanilla (liquid molecular hydrogen.Series of photos, showing the amazing planetary cakes, creations of the self-taught chef Rhiannon at Cakecrumbs. The structural layers of the cake for Jupiter are represented by the mudcake in the core (rock/ice), followed by the layer of almond butter (liquid metallic hydrogen) and finally coloured vanilla (liquid molecular hydrogen.Series of photos, showing the amazing planetary cakes, creations of the self-taught chef Rhiannon at Cakecrumbs. The structural layers of the cake for Jupiter are represented by the mudcake in the core (rock/ice), followed by the layer of almond butter (liquid metallic hydrogen) and finally coloured vanilla (liquid molecular hydrogen.Series of photos, showing the amazing planetary cakes, creations of the self-taught chef Rhiannon at Cakecrumbs. The structural layers of the cake for Jupiter are represented by the mudcake in the core (rock/ice), followed by the layer of almond butter (liquid metallic hydrogen) and finally coloured vanilla (liquid molecular hydrogen.

Series of photos, showing the amazing planetary cakes, creations of the self-taught chef Rhiannon at Cakecrumbs. The structural layers of the cake for Jupiter are represented by the mudcake in the core (rock/ice), followed by the layer of almond butter (liquid metallic hydrogen) and finally coloured vanilla (liquid molecular hydrogen.