We have a new washing machine

Suspended Shirt Installations by Finish artist and environmentalist Kaarina Kaikkonen who uses hundreds of second-hand shirts to create her often site specific installations. Suspended Shirt Installations by Finish artist and environmentalist Kaarina Kaikkonen who uses hundreds of second-hand shirts to create her often site specific installations. Suspended Shirt Installations by Finish artist and environmentalist Kaarina Kaikkonen who uses hundreds of second-hand shirts to create her often site specific installations. Suspended Shirt Installations by Finish artist and environmentalist Kaarina Kaikkonen who uses hundreds of second-hand shirts to create her often site specific installations. Suspended Shirt Installations by Finish artist and environmentalist Kaarina Kaikkonen who uses hundreds of second-hand shirts to create her often site specific installations.

Suspended Shirt Installations by Finish artist and environmentalist Kaarina Kaikkonen who uses hundreds of second-hand shirts to create her often site specific installations.

 

“Her most recent work Are We Still Going On? (top images), was conceived at Collezione Maramotti, a private collection of contemporary art in Reggio Emilia, Italy, and involves hundreds of children’s shirts hung in rows to resemble the interior hull of a giant ship. The shirts are organized by color on each side of the skeletal boat to represent a sort of symbolic dialogue about gender.” ( via colossal)

 

/ for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook or visit us on Pinterest

 

.

Advertisements

Our heads are spinning

Magical, living, breathing sculptures by Brookly-based artist Janet Echelman /  Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky. Magical, living, breathing sculptures by Brookly-based artist Janet Echelman /  Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky. Magical, living, breathing sculptures by Brookly-based artist Janet Echelman /  Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky. Magical, living, breathing sculptures by Brookly-based artist Janet Echelman /  Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky.Magical, living, breathing sculptures by Brookly-based artist Janet Echelman /  Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky. Magical, living, breathing sculptures by Brookly-based artist Janet Echelman /  Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky. Magical, living, breathing sculptures by Brookly-based artist Janet Echelman /  Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky.

Magical, living, breathing sculptures by Brookly-based artist Janet Echelman /

Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky.

/ for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook or visit us on Pinterest

 

.

We are connected

Photos from the installation piece 'Dialogue with Absence' that was exhibited in Kenji Tangi Gallery in Tokyo, by artist Chiharu Shiota Photos from the installation piece 'Dialogue with Absence' that was exhibited in Kenji Tangi Gallery in Tokyo, by artist Chiharu Shiota

Photos from the installation piece ‘Dialogue with Absence’ that was exhibited in Kenji Tangi Gallery in Tokyo, by artist Chiharu Shiota

for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook or visit us on Pinterest

We see clouds everywhere

'Cloud' - An anteractive installation made of 6,000 light bulbs by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown 'Cloud' - An anteractive installation made of 6,000 light bulbs by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown 'Cloud' - An anteractive installation made of 6,000 light bulbs by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown 'Cloud' - An anteractive installation made of 6,000 light bulbs by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown 'Cloud' - An anteractive installation made of 6,000 light bulbs by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown

‘Cloud’ – An anteractive installation made of 6,000 light bulbs by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown. The piece is made from 1,000 working lightbulbs on pullchains and an additional 5,000 made from donated burnt out lights donated by the public. Visitors to the installation could pull the chains causing the cloud to shimmer and flicker. (via colossal)

for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook and Pinterest

.

We make projections

thread-installation-05 by californian artist Pae white, colourful threads are criss crossing, cloud of threads, amazing art, innovative, 3d art, projections, thread typography, design, inspirations thread-installation-05 by californian artist Pae white, colourful threads are criss crossing, cloud of threads, amazing art, innovative, 3d art, projections, thread typography, design, inspirations thread-installation-05 by californian artist Pae white, colourful threads are criss crossing, cloud of threads, amazing art, innovative, 3d art, projections, thread typography, design, inspirations tthread-installation-05 by californian artist Pae white, colourful threads are criss crossing, cloud of threads, amazing art, innovative, 3d art, projections, thread typography, design, inspirations thread-installation-05 by californian artist Pae white, colourful threads are criss crossing, cloud of threads, amazing art, innovative, 3d art, projections, thread typography, design, inspirations

Series of photos from the amazing thread typography installation called “Too much night again”, by Californian artist Pae White.

/// The artist is experimenting in his works often with fragile materials that are forming mass in space with large sculptures: ” In this instance Pae’s threaded installation forms a dark cloud of criss-crossed black and purple across the gallery roof with individual threads trailing back to the wall where they spell out motivational super graphics, reading TIGER TIME and UNMATTERING, inspired by recent bouts of insomnia.”

for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook and Pinterest

Out of Scale

Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one's perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions. Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one's perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions. Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one's perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions. Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one's perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions. Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one's perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions. Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one's perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions. Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one's perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions. Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one's perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions.

Paris-born artist Jean-François Fourtou uses a mix of his childhood memories and inspiration from Alice in Wonderland to create a surreal series of his own entitled Mes Maisons (My Houses). The contemporary artist, who currently lives and works in Marrakech and Madrid, produces illusionary images that play with one’s perception of scale. The photographs switch between depicting tiny people in a world made for giants and hulking figures in hilariously small rooms. Rather than using technology to do the optical trick, Fourtou chooses to create environments around his subjects that alter their size ratios. By creating extremely large or dollhouse-sized furniture, he gives the impression of distorted proportions.

for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook and Pinterest

.

We make noise

From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs

From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs. (via colossal)

for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook and Pinterest

.