We recycle

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Mexico City based artist Pedro Reyes fabricates 50 functional music instruments from destroyed drug war weapons. He acquired some 6,700 weapons that were scheduled to be buried (as is customary in mass weapon disposals) and instead collaborated with six musicians to create 50 working instruments as part of a statement regarding increased gun violence in Mexico. The numerous firearms were cut down, welded and formed into a variety of string, wind, and percussion instruments over a period of two weeks last month. Via his blog Reyes says:

It’s difficult to explain but the transformation was more than physical. It’s important to consider that many lives were taken with these weapons; as if a sort of exorcism was taking place the music expelled the demons they held, as well as being a requiem for lives lost. […] This is also a call to action, since we cannot stop the violence only at the place where the weapons are being used, but also where they are made. There is a disparity between visible and invisible violence. The nearly 80,000 deaths by gun-shot that have occurred in Mexico in the last 6 years, or the school shootings in the US are the visible side of violence. The invisible side is that one of gun trade-shows, neglecting assault rifle bans, and shareholder profit from public companies. This is a large industry of death and suffering for which no cultural rejection is expressed.Guns continue to be depicted as something sexy both in Hollywood and in videogames; there may be actors who won’t smoke on the screen, but there has not been one who would reject the role of a trigger-happy hero.

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We convert

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A Gym transformed into a concert hall in the Pannonhalma Archabbey, Hungary by three young Hungarian architects Dániel Baló, Dániel Eke and Zoltán Kalászi. Photography by Tamás Bujnovszky.

Words from the architects: >> In order to create an interior which was suitable for classical concerts, first of all we had to somehow fade out the gym’s characteristic appearance and find a suitable cover. But further on, we were eager to form an atmosphere that would compliment musical events and to then partition the homogenous space through gentle transitions. We therefore created a spatial structure built from two items: This included the creation of an interacting translucent media system and a geometric grid of point lights. The media system’s hanging layers are made out of a thermally bonded non-woven geotextile fabric. As the fabric dominates over the beams and walls, we then blurred the room’s boarders through the use of different outlines and the translucent, opalescent texture of the fabric’s layers. We also defined the locations of the two main functions, these being the auditorium and stage. The point lights themselves are made from light bulbs which emit equal intensity light and hang in equal distance at the nodes of a square raster. These bulbs are hidden among the waving textile layers above the auditorium, and come into view above the stage thus bringing the musicians into focus. With the use of the textile layers, we succeeded in improving the room’s acoustics whereby the hanging ribs dampened the sharp reflecting sounds dispersing them through the space. This in turn, generated a more comfortable atmosphere and optimized the musical experience.<<

We make things fit

The Plugg Radio by Skrekkøgle is a simple radio that can be turned off by putting a cork in it. The future of electronics is clearly developing to a concept called ‘through the glass’, which employs iPhone-like touch interaction, making buttons become obsolete. The Plugg Radio by Skrekkøgle is a simple radio that can be turned off by putting a cork in it. The future of electronics is clearly developing to a concept called ‘through the glass’, which employs iPhone-like touch interaction, making buttons become obsolete. The Plugg Radio by Skrekkøgle is a simple radio that can be turned off by putting a cork in it. The future of electronics is clearly developing to a concept called ‘through the glass’, which employs iPhone-like touch interaction, making buttons become obsolete. The Plugg Radio by Skrekkøgle is a simple radio that can be turned off by putting a cork in it. The future of electronics is clearly developing to a concept called ‘through the glass’, which employs iPhone-like touch interaction, making buttons become obsolete.

The Plugg Radio by Skrekkøgle is a simple radio that can be turned off by putting a cork in it. The future of electronics is clearly developing to a concept called ‘through the glass’, which employs iPhone-like touch interaction, making buttons become obsolete. via iGnant / photographs courtesy of Skrekkøgle

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We rehearse

Paper stop motion music video from animation duo Katarzyna Kijek and Przemysław Adamski for Japanese singer-songwriter Shugo Tokumaru.  Inspired by an everlasting chain of memories, It features a continuous parade of about 2000 silhouettes extracted from PVC plates set to Tokumaru’s quirky track Katachi (which means “shape” in Japanese)Paper stop motion music video from animation duo Katarzyna Kijek and Przemysław Adamski for Japanese singer-songwriter Shugo Tokumaru.  Inspired by an everlasting chain of memories, It features a continuous parade of about 2000 silhouettes extracted from PVC plates set to Tokumaru’s quirky track Katachi (which means “shape” in Japanese) Paper stop motion music video from animation duo Katarzyna Kijek and Przemysław Adamski for Japanese singer-songwriter Shugo Tokumaru.  Inspired by an everlasting chain of memories, It features a continuous parade of about 2000 silhouettes extracted from PVC plates set to Tokumaru’s quirky track Katachi (which means “shape” in Japanese) Paper stop motion music video from animation duo Katarzyna Kijek and Przemysław Adamski for Japanese singer-songwriter Shugo Tokumaru.  Inspired by an everlasting chain of memories, It features a continuous parade of about 2000 silhouettes extracted from PVC plates set to Tokumaru’s quirky track Katachi (which means “shape” in Japanese) Paper stop motion music video from animation duo Katarzyna Kijek and Przemysław Adamski for Japanese singer-songwriter Shugo Tokumaru.  Inspired by an everlasting chain of memories, It features a continuous parade of about 2000 silhouettes extracted from PVC plates set to Tokumaru’s quirky track Katachi (which means “shape” in Japanese)

‘Katachi’ – paper stop motion music video from animation duo Katarzyna Kijek and Przemysław Adamski for Japanese singer-songwriter Shugo Tokumaru.  Inspired by an everlasting chain of memories, It features a continuous parade of about 2000 silhouettes extracted from PVC plates set to Tokumaru’s quirky track Katachi (which means “shape” in Japanese). ( via beautifuldecay)

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We make noise

From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs

From Here to Ear (v. 13) is the thirteenth iteration of an installation by French artist Céleste Boursier-Mougenot at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Primarily a sensory experience, the exhibit is meant to engage both visually and audibly as 40 finches hop delicately through a dense matrix created from hundreds of metal hangers causing vibrations and clinks that mix with the birds natural songs. (via colossal)

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We keep on turning

The table is designed in raw wood with sun yellow details and allows you to play both analog and digital music. It’s also a turntable for vinyl, a dock for your iPod / iPhone and CD player – all in one. The table is designed in raw wood with sun yellow details and allows you to play both analog and digital music. It’s also a turntable for vinyl, a dock for your iPod / iPhone and CD player – all in one. The table is designed in raw wood with sun yellow details and allows you to play both analog and digital music. It’s also a turntable for vinyl, a dock for your iPod / iPhone and CD player – all in one.

‘Keep On Turnin’ by Valerie Hebel. The table is designed in raw wood with sun yellow details and allows you to play both analog and digital music. It’s also a turntable for vinyl, a dock for your iPod / iPhone and CD player – all in one.

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Tangled up

chiharushiotainsilence2 When I first set my eyes on Japan-born, Berlin-based artist Chiharu Shiota's work, I wasn't sure if I was looking at an installation or a dark charcoal illustration. Though the piece echoes sketch-like imagery, it is in fact an installation piece involving a burnt piano in a room ravaged by black wool. The work known as In Silence is inspired by Shiota's own traumatic memories as a child, having witnessed her neighbor's house burn down. The charred piano is a direct memory of her neighbor's grand piano blazed up in smoke.  There is a melancholic aura that hovers throughout the incinerated room filled with singed furniture. The miles of thread woven in, around, and through each item within the space adds a feeling of entrapment. The way it engulfs the room's furnishings encapsulates the destructive and overwhelming nature of flames that have possessed one's material properties.

chiharu shiota - In silence installation When I first set my eyes on Japan-born, Berlin-based artist Chiharu Shiota's work, I wasn't sure if I was looking at an installation or a dark charcoal illustration. Though the piece echoes sketch-like imagery, it is in fact an installation piece involving a burnt piano in a room ravaged by black wool. The work known as In Silence is inspired by Shiota's own traumatic memories as a child, having witnessed her neighbor's house burn down. The charred piano is a direct memory of her neighbor's grand piano blazed up in smoke.  There is a melancholic aura that hovers throughout the incinerated room filled with singed furniture. The miles of thread woven in, around, and through each item within the space adds a feeling of entrapment. The way it engulfs the room's furnishings encapsulates the destructive and overwhelming nature of flames that have possessed one's material properties.

Photography of an installation created by Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota.

/// The installation, named ” In Silence”, was inspired by one of the artist’s personal traumatic memories as a child, having witnessed her neighbor’s house burning down. The pieces tangled up in black thread are echoing a sketch-like imagery and the burnt piano is in fact a direct memory of the artist, as it resembles her neighbor’s piano blazed up in smoke.

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