M

One of our favourite portraits – the mysterious ‘M’

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We dance


From our photo series: ‘Dance

This photo series captures dancers performing in the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern Museum in London. The slow exposure of the photographs intends to reveal the flow of the dancer’s movement and at the same time abstract the image, bringing into focus the dance rather than the dancers themselves.

We are together

Miyoko Ihara (2)Miyoko Ihara (3)Miyoko Ihara (4)Miyoko Ihara (5)Miyoko Ihara (6)Miyoko Ihara (7)Miyoko Ihara (8)Miyoko Ihara (1)

Miyoko Ihara /// Photo series of the bond between a grandmother and her odd-eyed white cat

We are coloured

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

Humanae/ Angelica Dass/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

Humanae/ Angelica Dass/ Humanae/ Angelica Dass/ Humanae/ Angelica Dass/

http://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-work-in-progress/

Humanae by Angelica Dass

Words from the photographer:

Humanæ  is a chromatic inventory, a project that reflects on the colors beyond the borders of our codes by referencing the PANTONE® color scheme.

The project development is based on a series of portraits whose background is dyed with the exact Pantone® tone extracted from a sample of 11×11 pixels of the portrayed´s face. The project’s objective is to record and catalog all possible human skin tones.

Humanæ it’s a pursuit for highlighting our subtle-continuous of our tones that make more equality than difference… our true colors, rather than the untrue Red and Yellow, Black and White. It is a kind of game for subverting our codes. The audience is free to read into it. The ultimate goal is to provoke and bring currently using internet as a discussion platform on ethnic identity, creating images that lead us to match us independent from factors such as nationality, origin, economic status, age or aesthetic standards.

(All the portrayed are volunteers, people who approach to the project, visit the space in which I am portraying and decide to participate on their own by a Internet call on the Facebook page, on Tumblr , using public spaces in Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Winterthur, Bergen, Daegu,Addis Ababa, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paris and Chicago)
(PANTONE® Guides are one of the main classification systems of colors, which are represented by an alphanumeric code, allowing to accurately recreate any of them in any media. It is a technical industrial standard often called Real Color)

Veiled Mystery

Irving Penn - Veiled Mystery of Morocco (1971) Irving Penn - Veiled Mystery of Morocco (1972) Irving Penn - Veiled Mystery of Morocco (1973) Irving Penn - Veiled Mystery of Morocco (1974)

From the series: ‘Veiled Mystery of Morocco” (1974) by Irving Penn

American photographer Irving Penn (1917 – 2009) is widely known for his fashion, portrait, and still life images, but he also pursued numerous opportunities to photograph the indigenous people of Africa, Latin America and Melanesia. 

In 1948 Penn went to Cuzco, a small town in the centre of the Peruvian Andes, to photograph its inhabitants. Photographing with northern light, Penn posed his sitters in manners that emphasized the texture and form of their garments and presented them with honesty through the strength of their expressions. Despite the cultural gulf that separated photographer and subject, Penn’s portraits stand as sensitive and intimate records.

In the years following his work in Cuzco, Penn continued to travel the globe with the curiosity of an anthropologist and the eye of an artist. He would design and build a portable studio for his travel into isolated areas. In 1967, he landed in Dahomey, a region now part of Benin. With his tent studio in tow, Penn installed his set throughout the country, documenting the pride and splendour of its many tribes. Two years later, he travelled to Cameroon to photograph the Kirdi, a Sudanese speaking ethnic minority from the north. In the solitude of his portable studio, Penn made visual records of a people imbued with inner peace and spiritual gravity.

During his travels, Penn produced some of his best photographs in 1970 in the highlands of New Guinea. In this mountainous territory, he made majestic portraits of villagers elaborately deco¬rated with a body art unique to the region. A year later, Penn carried out his final trip of this kind to Morocco, a place both familiar and mysterious to him, to photograph the men and often veiled women of the Arabic tribes along the Atlas mountain range. 

The power and elegance of these pictures, made into meticulous prints by the artist, reveal the affection Penn had for the spirit and traditions of these individuals and his deep respect for their respective cultures. (text via photography-now)

Our heads are spinning

Florencia Durante Envelopment series (1) Florencia Durante Envelopment series (2) Florencia Durante Envelopment series (3) Florencia Durante Envelopment series (4) Florencia Durante Envelopment series (5)

From the series ‘Envelopment’ – Incredible light art photography by Florencia Durante

We want to hide

Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (2) Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (1) Kimiko Yoshida.The Mao Bride (Red Guard Red).Self Portrait, 2009 (3)

Kimiko Yoshida – The Mao Bride. Self Portrait, 2009