We are out of space

Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (8) Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (7) Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (6) Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (5) Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (4) Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (3) Thomas Rusch Outer Space Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space  (2)

‘Outer Space’ –  Since 2012 Thomas Rusch participates and follows the “outer space” project of Michael Najjar, a Berlin based artist. Together they visited international space facilities and took part in cosmonaut training units. Thomas Rusch is documenting this unique artistic project on film and photography under water, on parable flights and other unusual locations.

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We are under the microscope

Fernan Federici     www.flickr (2) Fernan Federici     www.flickr (3) Fernan Federici     www.flickr (4) Fernan Federici     www.flickr (5) Fernan Federici     www.flickr (6) Fernan Federici     www.flickr (1)

Fernan Federicia€™s microscopic images of plants, bacteria, and crystals are a classic example of finding art in unexpected places.

A couple years ago, Federici was working on his Ph.D. in biological sciences at Cambridge University studying self-organization, the process by which things organize themselves spontaneously and without direction. Like a flock of birds flying together.

More specifically, he was using microscopes and a process called fluorescence microscopy to see if he could identify these kinds of patterns on a cellular level. In fluorescence microscopy, scientists shine a particular kind of light at whatever theya€™re trying to illuminate and then that substance identifies itself by shining a different color or light back. Sometimes researchers will also attach proteins that they know emit a particular kind of light to substances as a kind of identifier. In the non-microscopic world, it a€™s like using a black light on a stoner poster.

Federici grew up with photography as a hobby, so looking through the microscope at all the different colors and patterns he realized that the process was highly visual. He hadna€™t seen many images like what he was seeing published for the general public, so he asked for permission from his adviser Jim Haseloff to post the photos on his Flickr site. Today that site is filled with pages and pages of microscopic images, some of which are from his work, while others are just for fun.

“€œMicroscopy is always serious science,a€ says Federici, who is now a researcher at Pontificia Univerisdad Catolica de Chile. a€œFor us [in the department at Cambridge] this was something we looked at as outreach. It was a way to bring this scientific data to the general public.” (text via techhumorblog)

We miss the sun

sun photograpy nasa telescope zoom lens camera exposure composite photos shutter speed focus light astronomy space photography sun photograpy nasa telescope zoom lens camera exposure composite photos shutter speed focus light astronomy space photography sun photograpy nasa telescope zoom lens camera exposure composite photos shutter speed focus light astronomy space photography sun photograpy nasa telescope zoom lens camera exposure composite photos shutter speed focus light astronomy space photographysun photograpy nasa telescope zoom lens camera exposure composite photos shutter speed focus light astronomy space photography sun photograpy nasa telescope zoom lens camera exposure composite photos shutter speed focus light astronomy space photography

Fascinating composite photographs of the sun, by hobby photographer Alan Friedman. In his spare time Alan points a telescope skyward from his backyard in downtown Buffalo, directly into the light of the sun. Using special filters attached to his camera Friedman captures some of the most lovely details of the Sun’s roiling surface. (via colossal) / see more of this work on his blog
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We are doing the math

Immaterials, electromagnetic, art, photo, holograms, information illustration, design, metadata visualization, information integration

Immaterials, electromagnetic, art, photo, holograms, information illustration, design, metadata visualization, information integration

Photograph of a holographic projection representing meta data in space as a form, by Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby.

“Designers are increasingly faced with the problem of understanding and visualizing data-filled space and making it inhabitable. In their book Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby, who conduct research in the field at the Royal College of Arts, speak of the electro-climate and the electro-geography – which can effect architecture just as the real climate can – and refer to it as »hertzian space.« The two designers think of electromagnetic fields full of data. But in times of geospatial data and location-based services data also assumes this wave field-like materiality. Are screens an appropriate medium for this? What is the form of these metadata?

Now that location-based metadata waft through the space, thereby redefining contexts and places, a new field opens up to designers: How will information be usefully integrated into the physical space? Inspired by the fictional illustrations by Ingeborg Marie Dehs Thomas, who interprets the spatial expansion of radio waves, we attempted to lend metadata a form. Using the light painting technique, we placed our idea of these data in a room, making it haptic. The resulting forms depict possible data sets and examine the design possibilities between technoid holograms and personal notes.”, by Weave Magazine – Immaterials – The form of meta data, 2011

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We are looking for signs

underwater photography Handout photo of a free-swimming robot submarine manoeuvring beneath sea ice in Eastern Antarctica

Handout photo of a free-swimming robot submarine manoeuvring beneath sea ice in Eastern Antarctic / photograph courtesy of REUTERS/Australian Antarctic Division

 

We want to travel

Scientists study the phases of the moon on lunar models in preparation for an eventual manned flight to moon. space travel black and white vintage photography
Vintage black and white photograph of NASA scientists studying the moon.

Scientists study the phases of the moon on lunar models in preparation for an eventual manned flight to moon. Photograph by Fritz Goro