We feel a breeze

Storms Ben Messina (2) Storms Ben Messina (3) Storms Ben Messina (4) Storms Ben Messina (5) Storms Ben Messina (1)

From the series ‘Storms and Weather’ by Ben Messina

Advertisements

We need some air

Atmosphere by Andreas Minge (1) Atmosphere by Andreas Minge (2) Atmosphere by Andreas Minge (3) Atmosphere by Andreas Minge (4) Atmosphere by Andreas Minge (5) Atmosphere by Andreas Minge (6) Atmosphere by Andreas Minge (7) Atmosphere by Andreas Minge (8)

From the series ‘Atmosphere’ by Andreas Minge – “the power of mother nature reminds us how little we are. feel the atmosphere…”

We could so with some sunshine

Mitch Dobrowner (2)Rope,medium_large Mitch Dobrowner (3) Mitch Dobrowner (4) Mitch Dobrowner (5) Mitch Dobrowner (6) Mitch Dobrowner (7) Mitch Dobrowner (8) Mitch Dobrowner (1)

Incredible and powerful black and white photographs of storms across the central USA captured by Mitch Dobrowner. See much more of his work on his website.

Words by the photographer:

Landscape photographers count ourselves lucky to be in the right place at the right time if a storm system is moving through — but I wanted to actively pursue these events. Since storms are a process (not a thing) I needed a guide. I soon connected with Roger Hill (regarded as the most experienced storm-chaser in the world); he introduced me to Tornado Alley and the Great Plains of the United States.

In July 2009 Roger and I tracked a severe weather system for nine hours — from its formation outside of Sturgis, South Dakota, through Badlands National Park and into Valentine, Nebraska. Eventually we stopped in a field outside of Valentine, and there we stood in awe of the towering supercell (a thunderstorm with a deep rotating updraft) which was building with intake wind gusts of 60mph. It was like standing next to a 65,000-foot-high vacuum cleaner. It was unlike anything I had seen before in my life; the formation of the supercell had an ominous presence and power that I had never witnessed or experienced before. I remember turning to Roger, who was standing next to me, and saying, ‘what the ****… you have to be kidding me’. It was only the second day of my “experiment” in shooting storms, but I knew without a doubt that this experiment would become an important project to me.

Words are inadequate to describe the experience of photographing this immense power and beauty. And the most exciting part is with each trip I really don’t know what to expect. But now I see these storms as living, breathing things. They are born when the conditions are right, they gain strength as they grow, they fight against their environment to stay alive, they change form as they age… and eventually they die. They take on so many different aspects, personalities and faces; I’m in awe watching them. These storms are amazing sights to witness…. and I’m just happy to be there—shot or no shot; it’s watching Mother Nature at her finest. My only hope my images can do justice to these amazing phenomenona of nature.

—Mitch Dobrowner

We are going to stick to the couch

Spectacular photograph capturing northern gale force winds as they hit the harbour in Seaham, northeast England, baterring the seafront. Photograph by Owen Humphreys.

Spectacular photograph capturing northern gale force winds as they hit the harbour in Seaham, northeast England, baterring the seafront. Photograph by Owen Humphreys.

Wishing you all a cozy Sunday evening. H

 

 

.

We like it here

'It's raining, it's pouring' - beautiful photographs from Engineer/Blogger/Photographer Aishling Browne capturing a British Summer on the streets of Notting Hill, London.'It's raining, it's pouring' - beautiful photographs from Engineer/Blogger/Photographer Aishling Browne capturing a British Summer on the streets of Notting Hill, London. 'It's raining, it's pouring' - beautiful photographs from Engineer/Blogger/Photographer Aishling Browne capturing a British Summer on the streets of Notting Hill, London. 'It's raining, it's pouring' - beautiful photographs from Engineer/Blogger/Photographer Aishling Browne capturing a British Summer on the streets of Notting Hill, London. 'It's raining, it's pouring' - beautiful photographs from Engineer/Blogger/Photographer Aishling Browne capturing a British Summer on the streets of Notting Hill, London. 'It's raining, it's pouring' - beautiful photographs from Engineer/Blogger/Photographer Aishling Browne capturing a British Summer on the streets of Notting Hill, London.

‘It’s raining, it’s pouring’ – beautiful photographs from Engineer/Blogger/Photographer Aishling Browne capturing a British Summer on the streets of Notting Hill, London.

/ for more great Art, Architecture, Design and Photography works, come follow us now on Facebook or visit us on Pinterest

We brace the storm

black and white vintage street architecture photographer city architecture wind rain girl covering with newspaper protecting from storm
SPONTANEOUS MOMENTS – Chick Dropped in Soup: No, not chicken soup…It’s a literal translation of a Chinese expression for being drenched. Caught this well-dressed lady trying to cross the street in a torrential downpour.
Travel Photos, ready your cameras. The National Geographic is extending their 24th annual Traveler Photo Contest to July 11 giving those passionate picture takers an opportunity to let the world see their amazing photos. There are four categories: Outdoor Scenes, Sense of Place, Travel Portraits and Spontaneous Moments. With last year pulling in almost 13,000 images from all over the world, the contest features the most spectacular realities of the most simplest of moments. A sense of wonderment, personality and emotion transcend from these amazing images highlighting the diverse and remarkable characteristics of the photographer. The following photographs are a small collection of the editor’s picks in each of the categories.

Chick Dropped in Soup: No, not chicken soup…It’s a literal translation of a Chinese expression for being drenched. Photograph of a well-dressed lady trying to cross the street in a torrential downpour. / photograph by Brian Yen – National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

We keep a distance

storm hurricane sandy weather tornado typhoon tropical east coast USA New York evacuation hurricane storm rain waves alert 2012 warning wind black and white photograph
Hurricane Sandy churned the Atlantic Ocean as it barreled northward bringing fierce winds, drenching rains and flooding to the nation’s Northeast, where officials warned residents to stay home and ordered those along coastlines to head to high ground.
A hurricane is a type of tropical cyclone or severe tropical storm that forms in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and in the eastern Pacific Ocean. A typical cyclone is accompanied by thunderstorms, and in the Northern Hemisphere, a counterclockwise circulation of winds near the earth’s surface.
All Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas are subject to hurricanes. Parts of the Southwest United States and the Pacific Coast also experience heavy rains and floods each year from hurricanes spawned off Mexico. The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to late October. The Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15 and ends November 30.
Hurricanes can cause catastrophic damage to coastlines and several hundred miles inland. Hurricane can produce winds exceeding 155 miles per hour as well as tornadoes and mircrobursts. Additionally, hurricanes can create storm surges along the coast and cause extensive damage from heavy rainfall. Floods and flying debris from the excessive winds are often the deadly and destructive results of these weather events. Slow moving hurricanes traveling into mountainous regions tend to produce especially heavy rain. Excessive rain can trigger landslides or mud slides. Flash flooding can occur due to intense rainfall.
Between 1970 and 1999, more people lost their lives from freshwater inland flooding associated with tropical cyclones than from any other weather hazard related to such storms.

We hope you stay safe..

photograph of a huge hurricane / unknown photographer